‘The Quad’ recap, Episode 8: Good vs. evil Noni Williams and Cecil Diamond reunite as Eva Fletcher continues down a dark path

Season 2, Episode 8 — The Quad: The Beautiful Struggle

Alas! After two weeks of waiting to see whether coach Eugene Hardwick met his demise, a call to Eva Fletcher confirms that Hardwick is physically OK. After a shooting at his home, which left one burglar dead, Hardwick and his wife are at the police station giving statements. Fletcher is trying her hardest to get herself off her couch to meet her colleague. She appears to be in a haze, most likely from the medicine she’s been taking, and asks daughter Sydney to drive her to the station. Her odd behavior causes Sydney to worry and question whether Fletcher’s going to the police station is a good idea given her current state and history with the officers.

Although Hardwick seems to be grateful for the support, his wife, Venus, on the other hand, seems to have a bit of an attitude with Fletcher. Once the couple makes it home, Hardwick tries to reassure Venus that everything is fine, although it’s not. Hardwick escaped physical harm during the incident, but he was the one who killed the burglar. It’s evident that Hardwick has suffered trauma after he’s seen having flashbacks of the incident. Instead of being honest about these thoughts, Hardwick tries his hardest to suppress them and continues on with his day.

Back on campus, Noni Williams finally confronts Cecil Diamond, who brushes off her comment that he’s a “bad man” to discuss the upcoming symphonic band competition. Diamond couldn’t care less about Williams’ concerns since his focus is on winning and getting back at Clive Taylor. Williams knows she doesn’t want to fall back under Diamond’s spell, but with a little musical challenge from her former mentor, Williams realizes how much she misses the band. She feels needed by Diamond and later shows up to practice for the upcoming event. She quickly realizes things are not how they used to be as she struggles to learn her part for a split between herself and bandmate Kiara. Williams doesn’t have the strength to stand up to Diamond but instead lets all of her frustrations out to her best friend, Ebonie Weaver. Weaver, however, is upset to see her friend going back to Diamond after what he’d put them both through, and even more upset after Williams lies about being back in the band.

In the dorms, Cedric Hobbs and Weaver have been spending more time together working on their music, which seems to be a good move for the emerging best-friends-turned-couple. Hobbs brings some good news to Weaver: His aunt has acquired studio time for them at the same studio where OutKast recorded one of their top albums, Stankonia. All they need is a vocalist for their track and things will be all set.

But, of course, things were going too smoothly in Hobbs’ life. It wouldn’t be normal without drama. So for vocals, Hobbs turns to his ex-girlfriend Bronwyn — the girl to whom he made clear he didn’t want after sleeping with Weaver. She’s still rightfully angry at him and has questions about the nature of his relationship with Weaver, but she goes to the studio anyway to sing the chorus for their track.

Things immediately go sideways when Weaver and Williams show up at the studio and see Bronwyn with Hobbs. Bronwyn, sensing the tension in the room, asks to speak to Hobbs privately. She again asks if their breakup was because of Weaver. Hobbs assures her that he and Ebonie are still just friends, but he wants to know why it matters so much to Bronwyn. After a dramatic buildup, Bronwyn reveals that she’s pregnant. In a later conversation, she tells Hobbs there’s a good chance she may not keep the baby — her body, her choice.

Between Hobbs and Williams, Weaver has been stressed. While on her way to support Williams in the symphonic band competition, Weaver has a nosebleed and begins to vomit. They are the lasting effects from the trauma she experienced after being severely beaten, and Williams volunteers to go to the hospital with her best friend. After Weaver returns home from the hospital, Hobbs attempts to check on her but is met with a cold shoulder. Who can blame Weaver?

At the event, Diamond is not a happy camper (but when is he ever?). What was supposed to be a Kiara and Williams split performance would have to be a solo since Williams is nowhere to be found. As the band begins to play and Kiara prepares for the solo, Williams emerges from the crowd and the two bandmates begin to play together. The performance earns Diamond and the band a first-place finish.

But, of course, it wasn’t over. After gloating about his win, Diamond confronts Taylor with the information Williams found. Diamond threatens to out Taylor as a fraud, which causes him to step down from his position as band director.

It’s been a quiet episode for Fletcher, but definitely not without drama on her end. After meeting up with Hardwick at the police station, Fletcher decides to check on her colleague in his office. At first she appears to be supportive and helpful, even suggesting therapy before getting to the real reason she’s there. Fletcher asks Hardwick why a loan shark attacked him in his home, then boldly asks the coach if he has a gambling problem. Shocked that she knows more than he wanted her to know, Hardwick becomes defensive.

Fletcher continues her day still trying to settle the score with the new merger and manage life without pills. She assures the doctor she’s dating that she’s fine and no longer needs them. She later repeats the same lie to Sydney, who challenges her mother’s words by throwing the pills out. Once Fletcher realizes what’s happening, she desperately tries to stop her daughter from emptying the rest. The two argue, which results in Fletcher asking Sydney to return her house keys. The relationship was just getting back on track, but Fletcher’s pill addiction may cause her to lose it all — family included.

‘Atlanta’ recap: Season 2, Episode 3: ‘I love you, bro. I wouldn’t hurt you.‘ Every square inch of a strip club is a swindle, and they play Earn like Jimi Hendrix played guitar

Season 2, Episode 3 Money Bag Shawty

“This town run off stuntin’ on people.” — Paper Boi

Family, it’s time. We have to have an honest discussion about Earn and his inept (and at times hilarious) spending habits. Of Earn, Darius and Paper Boi, Earn is the easiest target. He believes no one respects him; the waiter who brought the guys free shots absolutely didn’t. To quote Cuffs, Earn’s “tired of being humble.” He wants to stunt on everyone who’s taken advantage of him and on everyone who has not taken him seriously in The A.

If you’ve ever visited or lived in or currently live in Atlanta, you know it’s not much different from any other big American city: The social ecosystem relies on flexing. The problem with Earn, as with so many others, is that he doesn’t have “it.” And by “it,” I mean money. And when he does have money, he fumbles it away. The most recent example of this occurred in the last episode.

And now here he is blowing through another check — this one from his and Paper Boi’s music hustle. To be fair, wanting to take Van out on a real date — remember that didn’t go so well during season one’s “Go For Broke” episode — is commendable, and he should’ve done that. Unfortunately, the South goes full South when a (white) man flashes a gun on them. Then Earn gets kicked out of the hookah spot because the owner says he used a counterfeit $100 bill. He didn’t, and the club owner was tripping, but at this point Earn is basically Charlie Brown and life is Lucy.

His last solace is a strip club — big business if you know even the slightest bit about The A. Onyx, to be exact. He buys out a section for the squad in hopes of redeeming the night. What could possibly go wrong in a strip club?

Watching Earn get hustled in every inch of the strip club is sad, frustrating and comical. Strip club prices make airport prices seem like a yard sale. And if you’re not careful, the DJ will have you blowing all $50 in singles you walked in with, because, pride.

Every square inch of the strip club is a swindle, and they play Earn like Jimi Hendrix played guitar. Van too: She feels bad for a stripper whom ostensibly no one was tipping (a game she’s been running for years, according to Paper Boi). “Ain’t like you supposed to be out here saving money,” Darius says. You can’t save money in a strip club, so you have to at least game the system while you’re there — which Earn doesn’t. The server tells Earn, “A bottle comes with the table” and then follows it up with, “Yeah, it comes with the table after you buy it.”

At this point Earn is basically Charlie Brown and life is Lucy.

As for Earn racing Michael Vick in Onyx’s parking lot, all I have to say is this: A man’s pride has an uncanny track record of getting the best of him. Earn’s no exception. But man, oh, man, that look of determination as he crouches down waiting for the signal to start? Incredible.


Van’s long-awaited return. It’s about time. After being absent from the first two episodes, Van reappears. Did Beyoncé and Donald Glover plan this weeks in advance? Van talking about her homegirl Christina acting brand-new on her and getting VIP Beyoncé tickets is the greatest example of timing and marketing in recent memory.

“White tears.” Atlanta does it again. While obviously not as intricate as “Florida Man” from episode one, the crying (white) mom is brilliant. For background, that scene, too, was based on an actual video that went viral of a (white) mother moved to tears reading rap lyrics she caught her daughter listening to.

Paper Boi and Darius’ “unique” studio session. Clark County is … interesting. He’s like a cocktail of Will Smith and Suge Knight. We never get the name of his engineer, but you had to figure the guy looked like Martin after fighting Tommy “The Hitman” Hearns in the world-famous “Brawl For It All.” Also: Clark saying he doesn’t smoke or drink, but yet saying that he does in his music — was I the only one who instantly thought of Future saying he doesn’t live the drug-drenched life his music portrays? I couldn’t be. I will say this, though. “Aye, man, I love you, bro. I wouldn’t hurt you. I would never put a hand on you. Just don’t f— up because I’m not the only one with hands in this world” is a golden quote. And did you peep Clark passive-aggressively trying to get Paper Boi to dump Earn as his manager? Something tells me we’ll revisit this again very, very soon.

‘Atlanta’ recap: Season 2, Episode 2: ‘I got them vampire feet’ And please don’t test the ‘no chase’ policy at home

Season 2, episode 2 | “Sportin’ Waves” | March 8

While last week’s premiere benefited from Katt Williams’ cameo as Earn’s Uncle Willie, this week’s installment, “Sportin’ Waves,” is a return to multiple storylines. Yet, like the previous episode, this week’s begins with a jack move and Paper Boi is the victim. Not only do things kick off with him being held at gunpoint by his plug of 10 years — just when you think you know somebody, I tell you — but the crime is committed by the most polite, respectful and contrite robber in the history of robbers (who doesn’t how the child safety lock works on his car door). He didn’t want to hold such a veteran client at gunpoint, but as we know, it’s robbing season. And everybody has to eat.

Let’s run down 10 highlights from this week’s episode. …

  • The marketing firm. Earn said it best. “This place, um, has a vibe.” Earn’s still assuming the role of Paper Boi’s manager, because what other gig does he have lined up? And it’s hard to fault him for wanting to increase his cousin’s visibility as a rapper. They just happened to choose quite possibly the most socially awkward marketing agency in Atlanta. From Pete Savage calling himself “35 Savage” to the unidentified artist dancing on the table while people from the agency stared at him a la Bobby Shmurda to the live performance that never was from Paper Boi, the entire experience was a train wreck. Earn and Paper Boi were attempting to market their music via a collection of people who have no clue about the inspiration, the direction or impact of the music. Consider it a not-so-subtle jab to the nature of American economics and how hip-hop is constantly manipulated for financial gain while being stripped of the cultural circumstances under which it was created.
“Get some black people up in here! That’s ya muhf— problem, boy!”
  • Alone in a crowded space. That’s what happened to Earn. He’s looking through the glass as Al begrudgingly goes through with recording playlist drops. As he looks, the entire office (all white people) stare at him. When he turns to look at them, they return to work — making an awkward moment that much more awkward. Nearly every black person can attest to being the lone (or one of very few) people of color at a work event or get-together and having it be explicitly clear you’re the “different” one. Also familiar is when Earn is the odd man out in a conversation between the aforementioned Savage, the rapper Clark County and his manager: Clark County’s code switch game is nearing Kanye levels as the tone and demeanor do a complete 180 on call. More on this in future episodes.
  • Darius is a man of his word. One of the coolest moments of the show is when Darius — the show’s most reliable character, if we’re keeping it G — gives Earn $4,000 as payment for breeding the King Corso dog they sold at the end of last season’s episode four. “People love dogs!” exclaims Earn — immediately bringing back memories of yesterseason when Darius was kicked out of a gun range for using a dog sketch for target practice. The synergy between seasons was dope, and didn’t overpower.
  • Earn just doesn’t learn. Admit it, though — you knew the entire blessing was going straight to hell in a handbasket. Re-enter Tracy, Paper Boi’s homie whom we met at the end of episode one. Speaking of …
  • Tracy is a keeper. Maybe it’s the authenticity, how much he sounds like a dude straight out of Atlanta. Or maybe it’s that authenticity combined with the fact that Tracy is already one of the funnier characters on the show. I legit spit out my water when he said he needed a pedicure because he had “vampire feet.” And just like many a black man, he loves his waves, calling himself the “Prince of Tides” but not allowing anyone to see them until he’s ready for a job interview he’s been preparing for. More on that in a bit …
  • A good plug is hard to find. Because Paper Boi can’t go back to his original plug for aforementioned reasons, the search is on for a new connect. Paper Boi and Darius visit two connects, and both appear solid until both completely ruin their chances — by being thirsty. The first can’t help but to not-so-secretly snap a picture of Paper Boi perusing the product and posting it to Instagram. The second, a hippy-looking white guy, gets Paper Boi’s phone number, only to try and promote his girlfriend’s music (she has an acoustic cover of his local hit “Paper Boy”). As we all come to find out at some point, Paper Boi is seeing how some people only want to use him for who he is, and how his presence can benefit them.
  • The “No Chase” policy. Tracy says he can double Earn’s $4,000 with a foolproof gift card scam. Earn should’ve kept his money, but here we are at the mall. Tracy, still prepping for his job interview, is telling Earn about the shoe store they’re in, and its “no chase” policy. This prompts the hilarious exchange:

“Those gift cards. They work in here?” — Earn
“Ionno. I’m just gon’ take this s—.” — Tracy

Tracy runs from the store with shoes he never had a single intention of paying for, and they didn’t chase him. The alarm didn’t even set off. Tracy’s a legend already.

  • Paper Boi’s missed bag. Earn takes advantage of the gift card scam but ends up having to take the bus back because Tracy left him at the mall. At the house he promptly hits the blunt offered to him by Paper Boi. It’s here they see the aforementioned Clark County rapping (and Milly Rocking!) on a YooHoo commercial claiming to “drink YooHoo like it’s dirty Sprite.” He’s getting money, but at what cost? Paper Boi refuses to sell himself out for a check, but at what cost? “I hate this s—,” he says. The game is the game. And it’s not always pretty.
  • Tracy’s Half Baked moment. We finally get to see those waves Tracy has been hyping up all episode as he sits in his job interview at a marketing company. Does he have waves? Sure, but he looks to have the 2018 version of the conk Malcolm X talked about in his autobiography. Needless to say, to the surprise of no one, Tracy doesn’t get the job because the gentleman who interviews him (plot twist, an older white male) says they don’t have any openings at the moment. Which, of course, makes total sense — to conduct interviews for a position that isn’t even open (to someone who looks like Tracy, with Tracy’s background). This prompts Tracy to launch into one of the greatest exiting rants since Scarface’s legendary scene in 1998’s Half Baked. “Y’all racist as hell up in here, man! F— you want from me, man! Get some black people up in here! That’s ya muhf— problem, boy! I don’t wanna work for you anyway! Amerik-k-k-a, n—!” Never have I ever heard a more fitting final quote to a 30-minute weekly television event.
  • One final question. Uhhhhh, where is Van?

‘The Quad’ recap: GAMU students get a peek at what a merger really means Doing what’s right isn’t always easy, and Eva Fletcher is learning that the hard way

Season two, episode 6 — The Quad: March

If we thought rumors of a Georgia A&M University merger had finally been settled, this week’s episode is here to remind us just how angry students are on both sides.

Eva Fletcher has been doing everything in her power to keep GAMU’s legacy alive, but during breakfast with her daughter Sydney, Fletcher told her that she would be speaking to the president of Atlanta State University later in the day. In the background, Fletcher’s anxiety medication remains visible, which causes Sydney to worry. Fletcher convinces her daughter that better days are ahead for the school and her mental health. At least, that’s what she hopes.

Back on campus, students already had planned a protest, but with the new information from Sydney, a busload of students packed up their protest and brought it to ASU, where the two presidents were in the middle of discussing a plan that would work best for everyone involved. What they hadn’t expected was a counterprotest from a small group of alt-right activists, which turned violent once GAMU students were told to go back to where they belong. Punches were thrown, and Madison Kelly was struck with a glass bottle. Both presidents were alerted to the chaotic scene outside. The only way GAMU students would return to campus was if Fletcher rode the bus with them, a suggestion from Cedric Hobbs.

Although Sydney Fletcher’s relationship with her mother and her best friend, Kelly, had been warped, the trying times have brought them all closer together. Later in the episode, Sydney explains to her mother that GAMU’s support system, especially after her rape, has brought a new perspective. Sydney’s words of encouragement and support for her university may even serve as motivation for Fletcher to keep GAMU independent.

Back on campus, the newly pledged men of Sigma Mu Kappa are in the dorms celebrating. An elated Bryce Richardson can hardly contain himself, while his new line brother and roommate Hobbs still can’t quite understand the hype. This alone causes him to be an outcast among his other frat brothers, especially since they believe special privileges allowed him to join the line so late.

In reality, Hobbs is being forced into this brotherhood as a favor to Richardson. Although being a Sigma Mu Kappa man is Richardson’s family legacy, Hobbs has gained respect from some of his prophytes because of his leadership skills, which isn’t sitting too well with Richardson.

In a separate plotline, BoJohn Folsom is still recovering after being jumped by the friends of the high school football recruit aiming to take Folsom’s spot. His concerned teammate and roommate, Junior, has been trying, but a frustrated Folsom has been ornery. The real problem might stem from Folsom’s lack of communication with their third Musketeer, Tiesha, who has been ignoring him since their argument over her flirting with another guy. The two still haven’t spoken since the party, and Junior has been trying to play peacemaker until a later conversation revealed that Folsom and Tiesha had been more than friends. Junior, still processing the information, isn’t sure whether he’s more shocked or hurt that his two best friends hadn’t been truthful with him. With Folsom and Tiesha’s “situationship,” it’s apparent that Tiesha might not have wanted to commit to Folsom because he is white. Instead of talking things out, Tiesha leaves Folsom, adding another layer of complexity to their confusing relationship.

Folsom and Tiesha aren’t the only ones with relationship problems.

Somehow, Hobbs continues to land himself in hot water with every woman he meets. Hobbs, who is still dealing with the death of his first girlfriend and the fresh breakup from his last, thought it’d be a good idea to sleep with his best friend, Ebonie Weaver, before flirting with another one of his peers. Although Weaver wasn’t initially truthful about her feelings for Hobbs, Noni Williams made it clear to Hobbs that their hookup meant more to Weaver than just sex. Hobbs goes to Weaver’s room to try to clear things up and finds that Williams was telling the truth. Weaver does have deeper feelings for her best friend than she’d let on. Before Hobbs could show her that he shares the same feelings, he was interrupted by his roommate.

The two have been summoned by their fraternity and end up being punished for Hobbs breaking code earlier in the day. Hobbs, Richardson and their line brothers end up blindfolded and wearing nothing but their boxers in the middle of the woods. The show ends with the young men trying to find their way out of the woods after their prophytes leave them stranded — something Hobbs continues to struggle with and may end up speaking out against in the future.

 ‘Atlanta’ recap: season 2, episode 1: The family scars that bind Beware of ‘Florida Man’ — it’s not as crazy as it sounds


Season 2, episode 1 | “Alligator Man” | March 1

“Robbin’ season. Christmas approaches and everybody gotta eat.”

— Darius

It didn’t take long for Atlanta’s season two to live up to its theme: robbin’ season. Off the rip, you just knew the two young boys were ’bout to hit a lick. The way they were talking in the apartment, from the special order they gave at the drive-thru. But really, the most dead giveaway is Tay-K’s “The Race” lyrics, Pop a n—– then I go out my way, being played as they completed their order.

Darius is right, though. Everybody gotta eat. Hence the guy in the fast-food spot running a holiday hustle and the two young men sticking up the place. The distraught young lady in the back seat is presumably a victim of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The only unbelievable thing from the opening scene is that no one got hit with a bullet (that we know of).

Elsewhere, even Earn gets robbed: An employee at the storage unit he sleeps in — remember he’s homeless — tells him he has to vacate and then proceeds to take a handful of Earn’s personal belongings. That isn’t much of a shock to Earn. Sleeping in a storage unit doesn’t lend itself to a long shelf life. But what is a shock is seeing that his cousin Paper Boi (who is on house arrest) and Darius aren’t on speaking terms. Never mind that he has the most awkward exchange of the entire episode when he calls Paper Boi’s girl “Regina” when her name is Tara. Earn is more concerned about why the two friends “don’t wanna talk” than about why they’re, in fact, not talking.

“What I’m scared of is being you. Someone everybody knew was smart. But ended up being a knew-it-all, f— up that just let s— happen to him.”

Nevertheless, leave it to Earn and Darius to produce a classic car scene. Darius is taking Earn to meet with his parole officer; this stems from when he was caught with marijuana after Paper Boi shot the guy at the end of last season’s first episode (“The Big Bang”) and him spending all of episode two in jail (“Streets On Lock”). Their first classic conversation occurred in last season’s “The Streisand Effect” when Darius told Earn how AIDS was invented to keep Wilt Chamberlain from breaking the all-time sex record. And that black people didn’t know who (the white) Steve McQueen is. This time around, however, Darius ignores Earn, saying his parents are going to visit his dying uncle in Florida. Instead, the exchange about “Florida Man” being the “alt-right Johnny Appleseed” who shoots unarmed black teens, kills flamingos, eats people’s faces and beats up people in hospitals is an instant classic exchange in a series with plenty. “Florida Man” is, in Darius’ world, a ploy by the government to keep black people from moving to Florida and/or registering to vote in the state. But “Florida Man” is a representation of outrageous yet very real stories that have arisen out of the Sunshine State this decade. It’s such an Atlanta conversation that you’re forced to say, “Well, you know, he might be on to something.”

The episode takes a dark turn, but at the same time becomes more illuminating, when Earn promises Alfred he’s going to visit Willie, played by Katt Williams. Judging from context clues, Willie is Paper Boi’s dad and Earn’s uncle. His girlfriend/live-in-rival, Yvonne, claims to have been kidnapped by Willie and is actually locked in a bedroom. Willie claims Yvonne stole $50 from him while he was asleep. She claims she didn’t, saying that Willie must have drunk it (he’s later seen sniffing coke in the kitchen). It’s also here we learn why the episode is titled “Alligator Man” — because Willie keeps a pet alligator, Coach, in his house. Yes, you read that right.

The cops eventually arrive. Both Yvonne and Willie try to downplay the situation, although Willie (as we can already tell) takes it too far. Earn’s attempts to make peace are unsuccessful. Willie says Earn’ll soon learn that “family is business.” Earn’s clap back is the most sobering revelation of the entire episode. But Earn and his uncle’s eventual heart-to-heart reveals two men struggling to get a grasp on life. Pride weighs down both men. “What I’m scared of is being you,” Earn says. “Someone everybody knew was smart. But ended up being a know-it-all, f— up that just let s— happen to him.”

A subplot to this episode is the reality of the unknown. We don’t know (yet) why Darius and Paper Boi aren’t talking. We know Paper Boi’s mother died — but we don’t know how Willie may have played a role in that. And we don’t fully know why Earn is holding an emotional grudge toward his Uncle Willie with regard to his mother. It’s part of the larger arc of this season. We know these characters. We know their hopes and dreams. We know their fears. We even know Darius’ deep-rooted conspiracy theories. But we still don’t know their entire story.

Maybe those answers will arise over the course of season two, but Willie gives Earn a gold-plated handgun (is it Chekhov’s?) that looks straight out of Nintendo 64’s Goldeneye and a piece of advice: “If you don’t wanna end up like me, get rid of that ‘chip on your shoulder’ s—. It’s not worth the time.” It’s an OG comedian/actor who had the world in his palms, but self-inflicted mistakes ruptured the potential he had in his hands — giving a current comedian/actor with nothing but green pastures ahead of him game he needs to survive not just the game but his own pitfalls. Earn also takes a framed picture of his Uncle Willie and mother before he leaves. Williams absolutely shines in this episode, adding to a very impressive 2018 for the controversial comedian that also includes a standout comedy special in Great America.

The episode ends on three separate notes: hilarious, comforting and similar. Hilarious because eventually Coach the Alligator makes his appearance. This allows Uncle Willie to peel out the back door with the fastest speed known to man. Not Usain-Bolt-in-the-Olympics speed, but run-from-the-police speed. Comforting because Paper Boi and Darius move toward peace. And similar because Earn leaves Paper Boi’s house still homeless. It’s darker in Atlanta, just as many predicted.

‘The Quad’ recap: Ghosts of the past rear their ugly heads Eva Fletcher’s past continues to haunt her, while Cecil Diamond unearths memories that will change his life

Season 2, Episode 5 — The Quad: Native Son

After a week of waiting for a new episode, The Quad is back! And with a new episode, new drama unfolds. That’s what we’ve been waiting for, right?

The episode begins with what’s presumably Bryce Richardson still dreaming of being a member of Sigma Mu Kappa — a dream that was snatched away from him when his roommate, Cedric Hobbs, got him in trouble with the rest of the fraternity and he was kicked off line. The scene then transitions from Richardson’s nightmare to Eva Fletcher with a new boy toy, a nice escape from the hell she’s been dealing with.

After her arrest for assaulting a police officer, Fletcher has been on a crusade to end police brutality and clear her name. Fletcher’s attorney warns her that reporters have been digging around into her past, especially her medical history, to check the officer’s claim that Fletcher’s erratic behavior may have stemmed from drug use. The attorney vows to get to the bottom of things and urges Fletcher to let him take care of the situation. After all, it’s what he’s being paid to do.

On the field, BoJohn Folsom is facing a gaggle of angry teammates. After a fight broke out at a party between him and a top football recruit, which resulted in punches being thrown, coach Eugene Hardwick didn’t take too kindly to the news. The players complain to Folsom as Hardwick makes them roll the length of the field as punishment.

In the dorms, Richardson’s father, whom we hadn’t seen since last season, pays him another intense visit after hearing from his brother that things weren’t going so well with the fraternity. Bryce doesn’t want to run the risk of ruining the family’s legacy, but he knows he can’t tell his father the truth about his situation. Richardson’s ear-hustling roomie, Hobbs, overheard the conversation. Since he’s partially at fault for the mess, Hobbs approaches Miles Thrumond (Quentin Plair) and threatens to have the fraternity suspended on grounds of hazing if Richardson isn’t let back on line. It was a good try but a failed attempt. Hobbs went back to the drawing board for Plan B.

Although Fletcher was told to let the attorney handle her situation, of course it’s Fletcher fashion to go and find more trouble. With a little digging, Fletcher finds another man, Dave Hill, who filed a lawsuit against the same police officer, then dropped it. She finds Hill at a shop where he works as a mechanic and listens to his story before trying to persuade him to join her on the crusade for justice. Hill, explaining to Fletcher that he wants no part of her mess, rips up the attorney’s business card that Fletcher had given him as soon as she leaves.

In the midst of all the chaos, the student body has disapproved of Fletcher’s leadership, and the most recent series of unfortunate events has dragged her ratings even further down the hole. There have been police checkpoints set up near the school — most of them involving the unnecessary harassment of students. On top of that, Fletcher has canceled the school’s Spring Holiday Fest, which is a huge Georgia A&M University tradition. Hobbs encourages the student body not to be so hard on Fletcher, and if they want to reach her, it’s simple: Text her. She’d given out her number at the beginning of the year for students to do so.

Bad idea.

Hobbs’ idea leads an angry student body mob to Fletcher’s inbox, where she begins to receive disrespectful and hate-filled texts every two minutes. Not the best thing for someone suffering from panic attacks and anxiety. Fletcher steps out to go grocery shopping, but even her normal routine is disrupted by Mark Early, the police officer who assaulted and arrested her. He warns her that he has seen the “glassy look” in people’s eyes before, implying that Fletcher was under the influence of something the day she was pulled over. Fletcher stands her ground but is shaken after the officer leaves. She returns to Dave Hill to tell him that she has once again been harassed. This time, Hill decides to join her crusade by adding himself to the witness list.

Returning to the dorms, Folsom still tries to keep an upbeat attitude despite teammates, including his roommate, Junior, being mad at him. After getting out of an awkward conversation with Junior, Folsom makes a nightly store run to pick up some gifts to make things right with Tiesha (Aeja Lee). Before he can safely make it back to his dorm, Folsom is jumped by guys avenging the friend he punched at the party.

Junior hadn’t noticed the extent of Folsom’s injuries until the next morning. Bloodied and bruised, Folsom remained in bed while Junior informed the rest of the team about what had happened. Hardwick pays Folsom a visit in the dorm and tries to take him to the hospital but is blocked by Folsom’s father, who angrily scolds Hardwick for not taking care of his son.

On a lighter note in the episode, Cecil Diamond appears to be living his best life. His cancer is in remission, the problem children from his band have been removed and living carefree seems to be the new motto. Diamond walks into the club, where he’s immediately greeted by his old band buddies, who ask him to sit in on their set. The youngest of the bunch, the drummer of the band, immediately takes issue with it. Diamond can’t figure out where the hostility is coming from until a friend drops by campus to see him. He delivers the news that the hot-headed drummer is Diamond’s kid.

Yes, you read that correctly. Diamond is the father of a 26-year-old he’s meeting for the very first time. The world isn’t ready for another Cecil Diamond, but it will make the upcoming storylines that much more interesting.

With so much going on in Fletcher’s life, and so few friends to turn to, Fletcher invites colleague and “friend” Ella Grace Caldwell over for drinks and appetizers. She confides in Caldwell, even after Caldwell and dean Carlton Pettiway have already shown they can’t be trusted after going behind Fletcher’s back and making their own deals. Fletcher picks this moment to be honest. She begins to talk about the cop and how reporters have been poking into her background, which leads to the real reason that she resigned as president from the prior institution. She tells Caldwell about the affair that led to her divorce and resignation. Caldwell seemingly reserves judgment, but a few short scenes later she declares to Pettiway and Diamond that maybe Fletcher isn’t the right person for this job.

Finally, there is good news for Fletcher. The district attorney’s office successfully filed charges against Officer Early, and Fletcher gained the satisfaction of finally having something go right in her life. But the scene also reveals Fletcher’s new man, a doctor, who leaves a large bottle of alprazolam – better known by the brand name Xanax — on her nightstand. Was the officer right all along? Is it possible that Fletcher is abusing prescription drugs because of her anxiety? All signs point to yes, since Fletcher refuses to go to the pharmacy to get prescriptions filled.

Back on the yard, the latest class of Sigma Mu Kappa men is being revealed to the campus. When the time comes for masks to come off, it is revealed that Richardson is the ace of the line. One by one, masks come off. The tail at the very end of the line? Hobbs. Seems like Richardson will have a lot of making up to do to his roomie-turned-frat-brother from now on.

‘The Plug’ podcast: ‘Run Me My Money feat. Jalen Rose’ (Episode 12) The ‘Fab Five’ legend sheds light on exactly how it feels to be young, dumb, talented and broke

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With the NCAA news exploding over the weekend, The Plug crew brought in an expert to discuss the state of collegiate athletics. Fab Five phenom, now NBA analyst, Jalen Rose sheds light on exactly how it feels to be young, dumb, talented and broke. Rose also talks about how he thinks the NBA can stand in solidarity with its collegiate counterparts, as well as how he became the first “Jalen” and what that means to him. Plus, we gear up for the Academy Awards and discuss the upcoming clash of two of the most powerful black women to hit the small screen. And, of course — the hot takes are plentiful. As always, please make sure you subscribe to The Plug using the ESPN app!

Previously: ‘The Plug’ podcast: NBA All-Star recap + Chris Tucker on ‘Rush Hour 4’ (Episode 11)

‘The Plug’ podcast: NBA All-Star recap + Chris Tucker on ‘Rush Hour 4’ (Episode 11) One last time for the craziness of NBA All-Star Weekend 2018

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A whirlwind weekend in Los Angeles is officially in the rearview mirror. But before moving on for good, we had to have the recap. Between the five of us, we relive the parties, pop-ups, concerts, games and, unfortunately for Tes, a stolen laptop. Comedy legend Chris Tucker drops by too. The famed funnyman talks about the role comedy has played in his life, from his Eddie Murphy inspirations to the many opportunities as well as his friendships with Tupac Shakur and Michael Jackson. Tucker also lets an exclusive cat out of the bag by revealing that he and Jackie Chan are already at work on Rush Hour 4. “It’s happening,” he said.

Previously: ‘The Plug’ podcast: The Eagles are here; Stephen A. Smith is too (Episode 10)

‘The Plug’ podcast: ‘Black Panther’ details — plus ‘GLOW’s’ Sydelle Noel (Episode 9) The Philadelphia Eagles make history — and Kevin Hart lives the dream

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The pleasure is all ours as we welcome a very, very special guest in the ever-so-talented Sydelle Noel. You may have heard about this film she’s in that hits theaters next week — Black Panther? Noel gives us the inside scoop on the movie, including her experiences with members of the star-studded cast.

From there, the squad and I pay homage to the Philadelphia Eagles, who of course just captured their first Super Bowl in franchise history. This includes us saluting comedian Kevin Hart living any fan’s dream — even if that included him trying to get on stage to hoist the Lombardi trophy. We also chat about the latest NBA narratives, including the free fall of the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Subscribe to The Plug on the ESPN app! We’ll be back next week to celebrate all things Panther and NBA All-Star Weekend in the City of Angels!

Previously: The Plug, ‘Super Bowl Time: Who Ya Got?’ (Episode 8): Super Bowl Sunday is upon us

‘The Quad’ recap: Everyone has a price Noni Williams makes a deal with the devil, and did Eva Fletcher just have a heart attack?

Season 2, episode 3 — The Quad: My Bondage and My Freedom

The campus of Georgia A&M University has been transformed into a war zone. Well, at least in Eva Fletcher’s mind.

The battle is on to keep GAMU an independent school as debt continues to mount. In the first scene, which sets the tone for the episode, Fletcher is ready for war, geared up in camouflage. Her enemies? The system that would force a merger between GAMU and a predominantly white institution. Her weapons? Books.

The scene segues into a meeting between Fletcher and the student government association to discuss the possible sale of campus buildings. Her intentions were good, but students are still unhappy with the way things are being run at the university. Board members, especially Dean Carlton Pettiway, weren’t too happy when they found out Fletcher met with students. But they have to ask themselves whether their old approach has been working. Doesn’t hurt to try a new one.

In the dorms, Cedric Hobbs has been suspicious of his roommates. No, they don’t have the best relationship, but Bryce Richardson (Larry Rhem) is running around late at night with a bad attitude and bruises and welts covering his body. Hobbs confronts Richardson and is met with the typical mind-your-own-business defense mechanism. That wasn’t enough for Hobbs, who follows Richardson to a room and witnesses his roommate being paddled. Hobbs, who may be the last person to know what happens when pledging, is confronted by members of Sigma Mu Kappa for snooping.

Down the hall, Sydney Fletcher and Madison Kelly are still at odds. Kelly is hurt that Sydney Fletcher abandoned her during her time of need, and Sydney Fletcher’s overprotective nature since her sexual assault is causing an even larger rift between the best friends. After the two meet up at a party that night, it seems as if all has been forgiven — until Kelly stays behind at the party and doesn’t show up until the next morning. The best friendship has turned more into a mother-daughter rebellious phase.

Hanging out in the quad of rival university Southwestern Delta is Noni Williams, who always looks up to no good. And guess who strolls up to join her? Supersenior Danny Brown (Tallie L. Brinson) — back like he never left. After being set up by Williams and permanently booted from the Marching Mountain Cats band, this is the first time the two have come face to face since the incident. He knows she was behind the setup, but her bigger goal is helping Cecil Diamond to “make Clive Taylor pay” for his actions during the Battle of the Bands. Williams, being the smart and calculating woman she is, spent enough time with Taylor to lift personal information from his phone and deliver it to Diamond. Yet, Brown can see right through it all. Toward the end of the episode, he pays a visit to his old mentor and warns Diamond about Williams’ behavior. Whether Diamond will take heed remains unknown.

Back on campus, we have gangsters rolling up on coach Eugene Hardwick’s office. Who knew Hardwick was ’bout that life? GAMU can barely afford to stay open, so I guess it’s asking too much to have security patrolling after-hours. As always, money is the issue. Apparently, Hardwick owes the two burly men thousands of dollars that he doesn’t have. They threaten to pay a visit to his daughters, and that sets Hardwick off. He goes to see his ex-wife, who has weekend visitation, and picks up his kids. An argument ensues, which wasn’t smart for her in the first place. Her gambling problem is why big men are rolling up on Hardwick and threatening their children. Where is he going to find $20,000 in a month’s time?

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and no one knows that better than Eva Fletcher. The entire episode, Fletcher is trying to undo messes. And for the first time, it seems her focus is on GAMU and GAMU only. She enlists Hobbs, who sort of owes her a favor after acting a fool at her party last season. To buy time, Fletcher has been finding creative ways to work out a deal to save the land on campus. One is agreeing to role-play with a man who holds $5 million and the key to her salvation. Yes, we did witness a grown man in a onesie, holding a bottle and baby food and calling Fletcher “mama.” We’ll just leave you to process all of that.

After the meeting with Fletcher, Hobbs is confronted by his angry roommate. He learns that, because of his actions, Richardson was kicked off line. In Richardson’s own words, becoming a member of the fraternity is something he’d waited for his whole life. If there was something to salvage from their friendship, this may have been the moment that permanently ruins it.

Even after all of Fletcher’s hard work, it doesn’t seem like the board agreed. In the last scene, Fletcher opens a certified letter that informs her that Ella Grace Caldwell and Pettiway have filed a petition to designate Edward W. Smith Hall as a historic landmark — the very building Fletcher has just worked out a deal on. The news is too much to handle, and Fletcher has either suffered a terrible panic attack or a heart attack.

A dramatic beginning, a dramatic ending. We just hope the drama continues.