Master P and Romeo Miller love the Saints, like Stephen Curry, and look forward to Lonzo Ball The father/son stars of ‘Growing Up Hip Hop’ on basketball, heroes — and courage

Seems like Master P and Romeo Miller are always fighting. It’s just a thing they do. The love is real between father and son, but so is the drama. No Limits Records founder Percy “Master P” Miller and his rapper-turned-actor son, Romeo, are executive producers and stars of WE Tv’s Growing Up Hip Hop, which chronicles the duo’s sparring sessions. Now in its third season, the show has showcased Romeo’s decision to skip the family’s record label event in New Orleans to film scenes for Fox’s hit show Empire. Papa Miller also wasn’t happy about Romeo being slapped with a $500,000 lawsuit after an on-camera restaurant brawl. On a recent visit to the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Romeo and his dad talked sports (of course), the Balldashians and keeping it real.

Which NBA and NFL teams are your favorites?

Master P: In the NFL, we got the New Orleans Saints.

Romeo: Even when we were losing, we still had the Saints.

Master P: We won the Super Bowl, and Drew Brees about to go back again.

Romeo: Let me tell you a secret. I’ve always liked the Cowboys, too. It’s always been the New Orleans Saints first, but Deion Sanders is my favorite player. Him and Troy Aikman and Emmitt Smith — them days? That’s the glory days for me.

Master P: As for the NBA, I really like Steph Curry. I think he’s an underrated player at this point. My favorite guy to watch play basketball right now, for sure.

Romeo: Let me say something about basketball. If the New Orleans Pelicans let [my] pops come over there and coach, I think they could make it to be a top-three team.

Master P: I’ve been talking to them about it a little bit. [Laughs.]

Romeo: My favorite NBA team is the Los Angeles Lakers. I’m a ride-or-die Lakers fan. I like Lonzo [Ball]; he’s a great talent. I’m looking forward to seeing what he can do. I like LaVar [Ball] too. Lonzo’s got a strong father figure in his life, and that’s amazing. Can’t wait to see what all of the Ball brothers do in their careers.

Master P: I take my hat off to LaVar for being such a strong presence in his kids’ life.

What’s the craziest lie you’ve ever told?

Master P: Hmm, I’ve got to think on that one.

Romeo: That’s the thing about him; he keeps it real. He’s not a yes man at all.

Master P: I always try to live by my word. If I say something, I’m giving my word. Now that I think about it, I do have one. I told my dad once that I was on my way to school when I had actually been expelled. I’d gotten into a fight at school and they kicked me out. So that wasn’t good to do at all.

Where do you get your courage?

Master P: Coming from nothing, growing up in poverty.

Romeo: I get it from seeing my two cousins die with my own eyes when I was 9 years old. You go give anybody $10 million, $100 million right now, but you don’t change overnight. And that’s why I always had the blessing with my family where I’ve seen both sides. I’ve seen my favorite cousin locked up, my best friend dead. And I know you can’t take nothing for granted.

Who is your childhood hero?

Master P: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He said, ‘I have a dream,’ and that meant something to me. That’s how I made it in this world.

Romeo: It’d definitely be my pops, and Allen Iverson.

Chad Johnson is happy the NFL is getting back to being fun again ‘Ochocinco’ talks ‘Madden 18,’ celebration rules, cleats and why in the world Terrell Owens isn’t in the Hall of Fame

Long before Antonio Brown’s twerking and Odell Beckham Jr.’s love-hate relationship with a kicking net, there was Chad Johnson and the infectious pizzazz he delivered to the NFL. The retired wide receiver, who played 10 seasons for the Cincinnati Bengals and one for the New England Patriots, brought a creative style and swagger to the field that many who’ve come after him have attempted to replicate. But no player pushed the limits of excitement on the field quite like No. 85. “Have I ever had a reason for why I do what I do?” Johnson said in 2008, after legally changing his name to “Ochocinco.” “I’m having fun.”

Every NFL Sunday during his career, fans tuned in for the Chad Johnson show, and to be dazzled by his electric plays in hopes that he’d reach the end zone. Because when he did, Johnson always had something up his sleeve for the touchdown celebration — from river dancing, to putting the football with an end zone pylon, to breaking out a sombrero on the sidelines after a score.

Six years after playing his final down of football in the NFL, Ochocinco’s personality and flair remain relevant. He gave NFL commissioner Roger Goodell advice for the league’s new touchdown rule, continues to advocate for his former teammate Terrell Owens’ induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and is even featured on the “Longshot” story mode of the newly released Madden 18. Before the video game dropped on Aug. 25, The Undefeated caught up with Johnson, who discussed his go-to team to play with on Madden, his love of soccer, the NFL’s new rules on celebrations and cleats, and why Owens will always be the Batman to his Robin.

How’s it feel to be in Madden 18’s new Longshot story mode?

It’s dope. Like, really dope. The fact that I have the opportunity to still be a part of the game of Madden, such an entity of that magnitude, something I always grew up playing and watching. After being a part of it as a player for years, I’m out the game now, but still able to be a part of it. Dog, that’s f—ing phenomenal.

Do you remember the first Madden you ever played?

I forgot what year it was, but I believe it was on Sega. And John Madden was on the cover. It was a longgggg time ago.

Do you remember the first time you were featured on the game as a player? What was that like?

In 2001. I remember it as a rookie. It was really dope to be able to see yourself. I was never able to envision myself on the video game, but the first time you were able to play, via yourself, it was cool. But you know what’s crazy? I never used myself anyway; I always used the Dolphins, because I’m from Miami. So anytime I play a sports game, I always use the Florida teams.

Besides yourself, which NFL player was the best video gamer that you ever experienced?

You know what? They all say they’re good, but I’ve beaten them all. From the NBA players to the NFL players to a few soccer players that play FIFA. They can all play because they all are very competitive, but none of them actually have the time to sit down and hone the skill set that I actually have being that I’m retired.

What’s the craziest lie you’ve ever told?

I didn’t sleep with her.

“I mean, c’mon. That goes without saying. Terrell Owens should be in the Hall of Fame. I just have no time for the damn politics.”

Who’s your favorite superhero and why?

I don’t have a favorite superhero. I didn’t read comics … not even as a kid.

When you and Terrell Owens were in Cincinnati, people called you two Batman and Robin. Who was really Batman, and who was Robin?

He was Batman. It was out of respect. We’re talking about T.O., man! He was one of the best, if not the best to f—ing suit it up. So I had no problem taking a back seat to one of my favorite receivers growing up.

Should T.O. be in the Hall of Fame?

I mean, c’mon. That goes without saying. T.O. should be in the Hall of Fame. I just have no time for the damn politics.

Where do you get your swag from?

Probably my upbringing. Just being from Liberty City, Miami.

Who’s the best soccer player in the world right now?

Cristiano Ronaldo. Period. It goes without saying. He just is.

Not Lionel Messi?

Who?

You don’t like Messi?

Who?

What about Neymar?

Oooh, Neymar is nice.

Have you ever been starstruck?

No … but I am waiting to meet Johnny Depp and Daniel Day-Lewis, then I’ll be starstruck. Deada–. Those are the only two people that I really admire as actors, their range as actors. Being able to get lost in character and what they’re able to do on the big screen is phenomenal. I’ve met Denzel Washington. … I’ve met everybody. But those are the two that I have yet to meet.

What was your first major purchase after you got drafted in 2001?

Uhhh, p—y. … It was probably my first car: Lexus IS300.

What would be your go-to karaoke song?

‘Free Bird’ by Lynyrd Skynyrd … Oh, yeah. Oh, f— yeah.

What’s your spirit animal, and why?

The orca. You should know that. They’re the smartest mammal in the sea, s—, let alone Earth. They’re just brilliant at everything they do. The way they hunt. The way they communicate. They’re the largest dolphin in the sea, which a lot of people don’t know — they are dolphins. They’re just fabolous.

Who in the NFL right now could beat you in your prime in a footrace?

Probably some of those dudes who run 4.2s right now. John Ross … it’s a few of them. It’s a few that are what we called ‘crackhead fast’ growing up.

The league has relaxed its rules on touchdown celebrations. How do you feel about that?

It’s dope, and now that they’ve loosened up, I want them to pay attention to the ratings — the people who are watching — now that they’ve allowed football to be fun. They’ve allowed players to express themselves through celebrations. As long as it’s not disrespectful to their opponents, and nothing malicious.

Out of all the celebrations from your career, which one was your favorite?

Probably the proposal. That one was dope.

The league has also loosened up on its rules on custom cleats. How do you feel about that?

That’s dope as well. Some of the players that are endorsed by certain products, that’s gonna be huge. They can make a pretty penny, with companies being able to get their products out — seeing them through certain players and individuals. Players can make beaucoup bucks, and these companies can profit extremely well.

When you look back at your career, do you think you were ahead of your time in terms of the flashiness, swag and celebrations you brought to the field?

You know what, with some of the rules that the NFL is loosening up on, and some of the things that are happening, we’re in 2017 now, and I was doing this almost 20 years ago. I might have been ahead of my time.

Is Madden 18 the best of all time?

Probably so. Because each year, you already know they improve on something and add something different so it’s better than the last. And technology being as advanced as it is, it can only go up from here.

Besides the Dolphins, which team are you playing with on Madden 18?

Just the Dolphins. I never switch up.

‘Power’s’ Dre — real name Rotimi — is also a music man The singer-actor loves Instagram — and baring his soul

Singer Rotimi’s new eight-song EP Jeep Music, Vol. 1 (G-Unit/EMPIRE, released Aug. 4), has been making waves — but you probably know the 28-year-old Nigerian-American New Jersey native as drug-dealing antihero Dre Coleman on Starz’s hit show Power. Despite his high-profile role, Rotimi says he just sort of fell into acting. “I’d just graduated from Northwestern University, and I was touring and performing at different colleges. My manager said, ‘Yo, we need more money. Maybe you should try getting another commercial, or print modeling or something, and see how it goes.’ ”

It clearly went well, but his heart is still deeply in music. He’s performed on stage with T.I. and with 50 Cent (executive producer of Power and co-founder of G-Unit Records), who both appear on the track “Nobody,” and Rotimi is currently touring nationwide with singer/songwriter August Alsina on his Don’t Matter Tour, which wraps this weekend in Vancouver, British Columbia.

We caught up with Rotimi to discuss his new music (of course), Instagram and the greatness of Michael Jordan.

Who was your childhood hero?

My dad. I wanted to make my dad happy all the time. Whenever I’d do something really dope, he would kind of reward me, [with] like, basketball games or music. I was just trying to get my pops to be proud.

What’s your favorite social media spot?

I like Instagram. It allows me to be funny, silly, write cool captions — but also kind of be nosy and see what other people are doing.

What’s the last show you binged?

American Crime. I’m on season two right now. It’s so good.

Your favorite athlete of all time?

Michael Jordan. He taught me early on what greatness was. How amazing it was. How it captured audiences. Love him or hate him, he’s great. It was a cool thing to see as a kid.

She was known to have this white Jeep in Jersey, so I used it as a metaphor for that relationship.

Do you have a pre-performance ritual?

I always go over everything with my dancers, talk to my DJ, and we pray. I play the show in my head and pray that it goes well and that everything that I want to convey is shown.

What about a guilty pleasure?

I watched a couple episodes of Real Housewives of Atlanta. At first I was like, I ain’t watching this, but then I was like, ‘OK, this is interesting, when’s the next one come out?’ I was like, ‘Daaang, he went to jail?’ It’s a good show. I was tryna hate, but I can’t.

Favorite throwback TV show?

Definitely The Fresh Prince [of Bel-Air].

What’s the first concert you ever went to?

Damian Marley. I grew up listening to a lot of Bob Marley. My dad was a huge Bob Marley fan. It played a lot in my house. Damian Marley came to Jersey and performed at this festival in the park, and I remember going with Dad. I was around 11.

Who’s the most famous person following you on Instagram?

I’d say Russell Westbrook, Snoop Dogg, 50 [Cent], and La La [Anthony] are the most famous people following me.

What’s the craziest lie you ever told?

That I played basketball overseas. That I was a ballplayer from Greece.

Did they believe it?

They believed that s—.

I play the show in my head and pray that it goes well and that everything that I want to convey is shown.

What’s the last stamp on your passport?

London, we had a show. I performed at The O2 Arena with 50 [Cent]. We did that; it was really cool.

What’s one place you’re dying to visit?

I wanna go to Dubai. I want to see that for myself, how man built something like that.

Tell me more about your new music.

Being that I’m a new ‘celebrity,’ I [was in] a really, really tough relationship. People call Jeep Music a project, but really it’s just me expressing myself musically. It’s a time capsule of when I met her — and how it ended. It explains exactly the stories we went through. She was known to have this white Jeep in Jersey, so I used it as a metaphor. It’s really not a project … it’s really me. People need to hear the story of what happened and how it affected me and how it affected her. It’s a story.

Are we going to hear any of your music on Power?

Not this season. I was so busy creating the project that I didn’t want to rush any of it.

What would you tell your 15-year-old self?

That you’re going to grow up and be a baaad m—–f—–. I would tell him to definitely keep playing the piano. It’ll change your life if you keep doing it. And always be true to yourself — continue to be true to yourself.

What will you always be the champion of?

I will always be the champion of my destiny.

‘Saturday Night Live’s’ Colin Jost and Michael Che aren’t mascots for the resistance ‘The Weekend Update’ hosts discuss real and fake news — and giving LaVar Ball a wedgie

Thanks to a never-ending presidential campaign and an even wackier Election Day aftermath, Saturday Night Live once again became the can’t-miss nexus of weekly political comedy that it hadn’t been since Sarah Palin was a candidate for vice president.

The show was rewarded with 22 Emmy nominations (tying HBO’s Westworld for most nods in 2017) and record ratings. It’s doing so well that NBC has spun off its Weekend Update segment into a stand-alone show, Weekend Update: Summer Edition, which premiered Aug. 10 and will continue airing Thursdays at 9 p.m. EST. SNL’s cast, including Update hosts Michael Che and Colin Jost, have become mascots for the Resistance. And while Kate McKinnon, Alec Baldwin, and Melissa McCarthy have embraced that role, it’s made Che and Jost uncomfortable. Neither of them got into comedy to change the world. That may seem odd, given that Che is a former Daily Show correspondent and Jost is a former journalist, both jobs that required a greater-than-average literacy about news and politics.

And yet, Che and Jost insist we’re taking them way more seriously than they take themselves. “If you had a joke they liked … now people are like, ‘Thank you, on a political level,’ or something, which is weird as a comedian,” Jost said. “That’s not really the point of what we’re doing. We’re not really doing political activism, we’re just trying to figure out what’s funny if we can.”

“It’s taken on different kind of importance that I don’t know that we’re emotionally capable of accepting,” Che said. “We want to piss off liberals too. I want to disappoint everybody, not just conservatives.”

What do you guys see your role as in democracy?

Colin: Class clown, probably.

Michael: Yeah, I think it’s just funny. It’s weird to get with so much news and so much coverage of politics and TV, that they’re still looking at comedians as the truth-tellers.

It’s all Jon Stewart’s fault.

Michael: It’s strange. You know what, you’re not wrong about that, either. It’s weird. It’s not really why I do comedy, you know. We always want to be funny. We want to be able to hit you from any angle and make fun of anybody. I feel like when people define your role, it’s easier to disappoint them, because they’re like, ‘Well, that’s, you’re not really on the right side,’ because you have to fit the consistency that they have already set for you, or the standards that they’ve already set for you, and I feel like with comedy, that should never be the case. You should never know where the ball is, to use a sports phrase. You should always be able to hide the ball.

Colin: Wow, you are a big sports fan.

Do you feel like there is anybody who is successfully managing to circumvent that without having to either face backlash or outrage from either side?

Michael: I think we do. I think we get written about for certain things that we’ve said, like making jokes about Hillary [Clinton]. I remember one time, we said in an interview, ‘Trump was smart.’ Before he won, it was like, ‘Well, you know he’s a smart guy,’ and people trashed us.

Colin: It was a whole headline, like, ‘They Think He’s Smart.’ How dare they?

Michael: They were so mad at us.

Colin: And first of all, we were saying both he and Hillary are clearly smart people, and the headline was, ‘Trump is Smart.’ He went to UPenn for college and is a billionaire. How many billionaires are idiots, you know? It’s tough.

Michael: I don’t know, maybe Floyd Mayweather? No, that’s a joke. Yeah, well I didn’t say [Trump] was the smartest, I just said he was — he’s smarter than me, that’s for sure.

If you got one gimme, one consequence-free opportunity to punch somebody out, who would it be?

Michael: That’s weird that she says it while LaVar Ball’s on TV. He’s just yelling at a lady.

Colin: Yelling at a lady for being out of shape, did you see that? Oh, my God.

Michael: I don’t know. Punching never gets you anywhere. I wouldn’t want to punch anybody like that, even LaVar Ball. Wedgie, yes. I would love to give him a wedgie. But he strikes me as the kind of guy that doesn’t wear any underwear.

Colin: You reach in, you’re like, ‘What?’ He looks back, like, ‘Yeah. Gotcha.’

Michael: Does that answer your question? LaVar Ball is pretty unlikable, but he’s getting the coverage, and people are entertained by him. I think people just need those outlets. You can yell at your TV at LaVar. It’s all entertainment. You kind of got to remember that and not take it too seriously.

Colin: Yeah, and if you’re a basketball player, you’re probably like, ‘What the hell is wrong with this? Why is he doing this?’ But then, if it helps basketball, and then you ultimately get paid more as a basketball player you’re probably going to —

Michael: Yeah, I mean when his son develops a rivalry with another player, and that adds a fold to the story and it makes people watch the game and it makes people excited. These kinds of characters is what makes rivalries important. That’s why I was telling people with sports teams, I think fans get that, because you see players and personalities that clash with … so like how mean were Boston fans to Derek Jeter, but when Derek Jeter left, everyone —

Colin: ‘He’s a good man.’ Welling up with tears.

Michael: Because he makes so many memories. You hated him, but you appreciate how fun he made the game, and how much fun it was to boo that guy. I think that’s also important too.

Colin: I was going to say I feel bad for his kids, but I don’t. I think they’re doing fine.

Michael: They’re great athletes, and you know what, even if they don’t make it, they’ve lived a great life. They’ve gotten a lot further than a lot of people, mostly because they look like they’re having fun. They seem to be enjoying it, and that’s cool, because at the end of the day, it is sports, and they could be digging ditches and tarring roofs.

Colin: That’s great, they enjoy it every time they’re on the court because there’s buffer from their dad.

Michael: You know they’re not going to get any fouls.

Colin: Think about that. That’s why they’re smiling on the court, they’re like, ‘We can’t hear him right now.’ That’s why they’re trying to get the crowd louder. They’re like, ‘Pump it up so that we can’t hear our dad yelling from the stands.’

Oh, no, you make them sound like the Jacksons.

Michael: Oh, I mean, yeah. I think Joe Jackson wears underwear though.

Colin: That’s the one difference.

A lot of comedians who predated social media complain about YouTube ruining the culture of stand-up.

Colin: I’m amazed people will write reviews of a show and quote every joke in it. I’m like, ‘Well, you just gave away all their material.’ You have to realize probably not so many are going to read that, but you just feel self-conscious as a comedian. If they quote your jokes, you’re like, ‘Oh, now I feel weird telling those jokes, because they’re already out there.’

Michael: Yeah, it kind of hurts the integrity of what you’re trying to do.

You guys grew up with the internet more than, say, someone like Chris Rock or Louis C.K.

Colin: Yeah, but when it’s on phones — you could record stuff when we were younger, or when we were starting out, but not everyone had a phone with a camera on it, so every single person in an audience has the ability to record your entire set.

Michael: There’s a company called Yondr. Do you ever use them?

Colin: Is that — they shut down phones?

Michael: They put a phone in a pouch, and they lock up your phone pretty much. [Dave] Chappelle does it. [Chris] Rock does it. Hannibal [Buress] does it. … I did it at Denver Comedy Works, and it’s amazing because your attention span, your sense of focus as an audience, is completely different. When the show starts, you’re looking at the stage. You’re not texting. You’re not trying to get a picture. You’re not trying to take a selfie. You’re not scrolling through Instagram one last time. The only thing going on is the stage, and the focus and the crowds are so much better and so much more attentive. It’s different. It’s night and day.

Did you work on your high school paper?

Colin: I did. I was the editor in chief of my high school newspaper, The Owl, no big deal. But then I worked at . . .

Michael: You’re right, that is no big deal.

Colin: . . . I worked at the Staten Island Advance, which is a newspaper on Staten Island. That was my first job.

How did you go from serious journalism to fake news?

Colin: I wrote, it’s so dumb, a humor column for my high school paper. You’ve got to start somewhere. And then for the real paper I worked at, I would just write things in my spare time, you know, Onion-style things at the time. I always wanted to do comedy. I just took a job because there was a job open, you know, like a journalism job. I’m shocked now, having … like it was a really good newspaper, even though it’s a small Staten Island newspaper. They have a really good staff and everything there, and I learned a lot about journalism while I was there, and when I see things now, like there’s so many factual errors in articles, and I’m like, ‘Where is any sense of integrity to it?’ That’s the strange thing to me. Certain things I get when people complain, like when politicians complain about the media and stuff, I see elements of it, because I’m like, yeah, when they get something wrong, or you just said something and then you’re misquoted or it’s changed or facts are wrong in the story and no one checked them. You’re like, you’re leaving yourself open to being criticized, you know?

The Daily Show built its brand on media criticism, and you guys have both spoken up about pointing out what we get wrong sometimes. Do you ever feel like that’s something you want to incorporate more into Weekend Update?

Michael: That’s sort of more of a Daily Show thing. We’re always kind of wary about doing what seems familiar, because as comedy fans, it’s a thing that we’ve seen.

And even at the show, we’re doing the job that Tina Fey did, and Amy Poehler, and Norm MacDonald, and Seth Meyers and all these people. They did it so well and at such a high level, and they’re so talented. We have to find a way to do that same thing and make it your own, you kind of don’t want to do the same thing as — it’s so easy to do what’s familiar because you’ve seen it done so well. You kind of just want to make it your own. So we started to make it a little bit more opinionated, a little bit more longer runs, a little bit more of the way that actual cable news is, as opposed to the way local news is, like how it started, where it was literally reading headlines. Now it’s a little bit more of a narrative.

Colin: It’s sometimes harder to get into some of the media stuff, because we don’t have so much time. Sometimes you have to get a little more in depth to explain, OK, this was the angle from that media source, and here’s why that’s wrong.

Michael: That’s why we’re really excited about doing these half-hour Updates, because we’ll have a little bit more time to kind of unravel that onion.

Actress Camille Guaty is redefining what it means to be a ‘diva’ The star of ‘Daytime Divas’ loves vegan donuts and going hard for her dreams

Camille Guaty stars in VH1’s new scripted series Daytime Divas as former journalist Nina Sandoval, a character riddled with scandal and jaw-dropping secrets, and a past full of love affairs and power struggles. Daytime Divas, based on Star Jones’ 2011 Satan’s Sisters, is about the women of fictional daytime show The Lunch Hour and welcomes viewers into an over-the-top world filled with fits, backstabbing and gossip. But, melodrama aside, Guaty stresses that Nina’s go-getter, hustler mentality is what she admires most about the character. Guaty’s own definition of “diva” has evolved to include the kind of courage she needed to defy her Cuban-Puerto Rican immigrant parents over the stigma they associated with acting. She also talks about the great doughnuts in Los Angeles’ Highland Park neighborhood.

Is there any part of Nina that you find similar to yourself?

Nina is a hot mess, to be honest. She’s smart and intelligent, but the way things unfold for her throughout the series it’s like she never … plans. But she’s a go-getter, so that part of her I’ve connected with.

Is it better to look perfect and be tardy — or look just OK and be on time?

I always just look OK and I’m late. I’m not kidding! I’ll be late, doing my makeup in the car. Is there an in-between answer?!

“ Why can’t being a diva mean being positive? … It should mean tenacious, ambitious and vivacious.”

How has your definition of ‘diva’ changed since working on Daytime Divas?

A lot of people think it means ‘snobby,’ or someone who is disrespectful and talks down to others. Why can’t being a diva mean being positive? And refer to a woman who knows what she wants and goes after it? It should mean tenacious, ambitious and vivacious.

What’s the craziest lie you’ve ever told?

It’s not too crazy, but it still makes me laugh. I was in high school. It was my first and only time trying to sneak out of the house, and my dad caught me. I said, “Oh, I’m just going to camp in the backyard.” We had a woods-like backyard. I thought he fell for it, but then my boyfriend came to the cul-de-sac and my dad was waiting outside and was like, “Oh, camping?”

How did you get your start in acting?

I always knew I wanted to be an actress. I can’t remember wanting to do anything else. But my parents didn’t want me to pursue it. Like my character, Nina, I was willing to put myself out there. I remember banging on the door of casting director Adrienne Stern. I was at her door so often that it got to a point where her assistant was like, “She will call you if she’s interested.” I was relentless. Adrienne eventually got back to me and connected me with a manager who I’m still with today.

Why were your parents against you pursuing acting?

My dad came from Cuba, and my mom from Puerto Rico — they know the value of a dollar and understand how hard it is to sustain a living here. Parents only want what’s best for you and … it was just fear that made them try to change my mind. When they came to visit me, I was on TV. My dad started crying, and I remember saying, “I told you!”

What’s your go-to karaoke song?

[Alannah Myles’] ‘Black Velvet’! I’m more of a make-you-laugh kind of person, so I think ‘Black Velvet’ brings out a little of the inner sultry woman that I don’t really bring out too often.

“I’m usually cast as the girl next door, so I was excited to play a bad girl.”

Where does your courage come from?

I honestly don’t know, but ask my dad and he’ll tell you that I was a stubborn child, so that could be part of it. I knew what I wanted and wasn’t going to stop until I got there. I think it was just in me, that courage. I got a lot of lucky breaks from national auditions too. My first one was one with NBC for a new soap opera, and I was one of 10 actors that they flew in to California. Then DreamWorks was my second national audition, where I made it to the final 20. And then I made it to the final seven on Popstars. I was getting far in these auditions, so it was a sign to me that I was meant to be doing this.

What’s your favorite late-night run?

At the moment, it’s Donut Friend! It’s in Highland Park, an up-and-coming, cool, hipster neighborhood in Los Angeles. I’m not one for sweets, but my husband loves these doughnuts. I had one for the first time the other day and was in heaven! It’s like a DIY [vegan] donut where you can add whatever toppings you want.

What have you learned from your work?

If you know what you want to do, you don’t have to know how it will happen — that’s impossible to figure out. But do whatever it takes within your moral compass to reach your goal. People see actors and don’t realize that we get a lot of noes, and that’s why we rejoice when we get a yes.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and length.

Idris Elba talks ‘The Dark Tower,’ Mayweather vs. McGregor, Usain Bolt — and Pelé Even with a resume that includes ‘The Wire’ and playing Beyoncé‘s husband, an underdog mentality keeps him motivated

It’s media day for Idris Elba: 48 hours before the release of his newest film, an adaptation of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower. Elba takes on the role of Roland Deschain (The Gunslinger) as he battles Matthew McConaughey as Walter O’Dim (The Man In Black) for the safety of the universe. Elba is genuinely excited, but admitted he knew very little about King’s eight-part, 4,250-page magnum opus when he first read the script. In fact, he hadn’t read a single page.

“It hadn’t piqued my interest,” he said. “But as soon as I got invited to the script, I was intrigued. I looked at all the iconography, thinking, ‘That ain’t me!’ ” He lets out a laugh from the pit of his stomach. “I’m reading the script like I’m the Man In Black, right? No, no, no. You’re The Gunslinger.”

Besides his title role in the BBC’s acclaimed series, Luther, for which he won a Golden Globe after being nominated five times for a variety of roles, Elba’s appeared in Prometheus, Finding Dory (2016), Beasts of No Nation (2015), Pacific Rim (2013), Thor (2011), and Takers (2010). He had a recurring role on the landmark series The Office, and starred with Beyoncé in 2009’s Obsessed. There were also many rumors about him becoming the next James Bond — Elba’s no stranger to diversity in his character portfolio.

But for many, the 45-year-old London-born superstar’s most lauded role will forever remain the shrewd, vindictive drug capo Stringer Bell in HBO’s Baltimore gospel The Wire.

He says that he works best when he feels a bit of an underdog.

“I grew up in a time where the complexion I have was not favored,” said Elba. “Lighter-skinned actors were favored in these roles. I’m used to being the underdog.” Could King’s character look like Elba? A black guy? The doubt was motivation for Elba. “I don’t really listen to it,” he said. “I’ll always go for the guy who has to work harder to get there. That’s pretty much been my journey.” (King has sung the praises of Elba’s work as The Gunslinger. He sees it as nothing short of incredible.)

In an ideal world for Elba, The Dark Tower is the beginning of what becomes a series — like The Lord of the Rings. There’s so much of King’s opus to be told that can’t be whittled down to a two-hour movie. But he’s also excited to talk about Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor’s upcoming fight, his fave athletes, and how certain streaming apps please the music nerd in him.

Favorite athlete of all time.

My favorite athlete was/is Pelé.

Exceptional choice. But why Pelé?

Phenomenal footballer. One of the greatest that’s ever did it.

“I’m a competitive person. I love to fight. I have a pain threshold.”

Favorite current athlete?

Usain Bolt, at this point.

I know you’re a big music fan. Are you #TeamTidal, #TeamSpotify or #TeamAppleMusic?

I use Tidal and Apple Music. I think they’re both great. I find Tidal interesting in terms of the accessibility to the footnotes and album credits. That’s something I like. I’m bit of a nerd. I like to see who wrote stuff and produced it. I find Tidal a lot more accessible in that sense. I think Apple Music is a great service all around. It works almost everywhere in the world. I like that.

To train for The Dark Tower, you trained in both boxing and mixed martial arts.

The best I’ve been in physical and mental health, the time my body works the best, is when I train. I’m a competitive person. I love to fight. I have a pain threshold. I consider myself alive as long as I’m able to go somewhere and hit a bag.

“I grew up in a time where the complexion I have was not favored.”

How do you think Mayweather-McGregor will play out later this month?

Floyd Mayweather has a challenge on his hands. He’s fighting someone at the peak of his career who’s a very agile mixed martial artist. I believe that there is a real chance of McGregor not penetrating the impenetrable Floyd Mayweather as a boxer. But penetrating his composure as a fighter.

So you’re giving McGregor a legit shot?

Listen, Floyd Mayweather’s camp is like, ‘Yo, man. How you gon’ say that?’ (Laughs.) But I never said he was gonna get beat. But there’s a chance that McGregor can lay one on him. And if he does that, he’s such a fast striker that he will continue to do it. Conor McGregor has nothing to lose. Floyd Mayweather has an impeccable 49-0 career to lose. So Conor McGregor’s coming in to fight and Floyd is gonna have to box because that’s what he knows. When you’re a mixed martial artist, you have certain agility that does a couple of things. One, boxers move slightly different when you’re being struck. And two, it gets annoying. Your composure goes in a different way because of the way kickboxers move. Now he’s not allowed to kick. He’s gonna have to box, but it’s about the agility. It’s about the striking, about how quickly they strike and the tempos. There are all sorts of things that I think Floyd needs to be very, very careful of. That’s just my opinion.

Oscar winner Halle Berry talks Prince, Bruno Mars — and having no regrets, ‘not a one’ The star of ‘Kidnap’ took on her new role to prove a point

Two years ago, Halle Berry — perhaps the best known black female actor of our time — sat on a dais at Comic-Con and talked about how challenging it was for her to secure roles as a 40-something black woman in Hollywood. Halle Berry said that. She of great beauty. And of great achievement: the speech Berry gave on the occasion of her historic 2002 Oscar win for the emotionally complex Monster’s Ball has more than 4 million views. And she of great superhero badassery. Halle Berry struggles to get Hollywood to see her.

“It’s a different landscape for men when they age,” she says now. “Men somehow get better, and women just get older. It’s part of the stereotype, right? I think my mission … now is to try to dispel those images and those stereotypes … And also to personify that as women get older, we get better, too. With our age comes confidence, comes assurance about our craft. We want to tell stories that we really want to tell.”

This week, Berry is turning a Hollywood trope on its head. She’s starring in the new feature film Kidnap, as a mother fighting — literally, and physically — to get her child back. Berry resonates with movie magic and can save the day while she’s at it.

This role is one that real-life mom Berry is primed to tell. “Being a mother now of two children … I’ve always known … if you put a mother’s child in danger, she’ll become a lioness, ferocious and fierce. I’ve always known the heart of a woman, the heart of a mother,” she said. “So, when the script came my way, I just felt … what I’ve been through — on many different personal journeys — I just knew that this was something I needed to express. And I thought it was time for women — men always save the day. It takes me back to Taken with Liam Neeson, a movie I absolutely love. I thought, Why can’t a woman do that?”

Berry chats about the real-life woman who saved her, why she’ll always champion black lives and women and why you’ll never — ever – get her to do karaoke.

Who is your childhood hero?

My fifth-grade teacher Yvonne Sims. She was my hero then, she’s my hero now. She’s the godmother to my children. She is like a mother figure, but also like the best friend you could ever have. I was so lucky that she found me in the fifth grade. I was at a crossroads. There was a lot of drama and turmoil in my family. She came along and just like an angel, just plucked me up, and really her influence changed the trajectory of my life.

Where does your courage come from?

Her. My courage came from her. Because she had the belief in me when I was very young, that I could achieve. That I was worthy. I was a bit bullied, and she esteemed me — always — and taught me to fight through the hard times. And one of the biggest lessons she taught me was to always shine again, and to just kind of deal with the valleys — because the peaks always return.

“It takes me back to Taken with Liam Neeson, a movie I absolutely love. I thought, Why can’t a woman do that?”

What will you always be the champion of?

Children. Women’s rights. Black Lives Matter — and causes like that. [Places] where I feel like I can use my voice, and actually make a difference.

What’s your favorite social media spot?

I’m Instagram. That’s my medium right now. That’s my favorite place to kind of express myself right now. But I have an app that I’m [launching] called Hallewood that will become a place that I’m going to really love to be. It’s a fan-based site, but it will be a place where I can really connect with fans, and talk to them, have contact. Actually meet them. We can have real, deep conversations about the things you just asked me about, like what do I stand for. It’s going to be a really interesting place.

Last show you binge-watched?

Probably HBO’s The Night Of, was my last binged show.

What’s your go-to karaoke song?

That’s one thing I cannot do! That’s one thing you cannot get me to do. I’m serious. You cannot get me to karaoke. I am not. I’m really not. I will not. There are lots of other things. Just not that!

“And one of the biggest lessons she taught me was to always shine again, and to just kind of deal with the valleys because the peaks always return.”

First concert you went to?

My first concert was Prince. That man, his music changed my childhood and my teenage years. He got me through some s—! I was a huge, admiring fan of his, and I became a friend of his during his lifetime.

Last concert you went to?

Bruno Mars. We saw him in Vegas on New Year’s.

What would you tell your 15-year-old self?

I would say, ‘Girl, do it just as you did. Because when you act, you’re pretty damn good.’ All I know is that. I have no regrets. No regrets, not a one.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and length.

Comedy Central’s Rikki Hughes is the woman behind the big names The showrunner for Comedy Central’s ‘Hood Adjacent’ talks her favorite athletes and the influence of her late father

In the early 1990s, Rikki Hughes was headed to medical school. Her game plan was set. Life: all figured out.

Then she got an opportunity to spend a summer on the road with all of your favorite ’90s rappers. So she spoke to her mom and dad about going off on this adventure, with the promise to return to UCLA and go to medical school.

“Look,” she said to her parents back then, “I have the opportunity to go to take these artists on the road, and they’ve never been outside of Long Beach — it’s Snoop and Warren G and those guys. This is a tour we’re going on. I can come back, I can defer my enrollment, and I can still go back to UCLA for medical school.”

To her surprise, her mom agreed. “You know, this might be the only opportunity you have in your life to have someone else pay you to travel the world. Just know you can always come home.” That conversation was one of the most empowering things that has ever happened to her. It was life-changing.

“When I got back … my peers … and even my mentor at medical school, they’d graduated and had like $300,000 worth of loans, making like $80,000 a year. I, on the other hand, was at about $150,000 a year, no loans, no kids, so I was like, ‘Kind of made a good decision there!’ ” She ended up running the international department for Priority Records and left in 2001 to go produce TV. Another good decision.

And after a career in music, Hughes is now the “woman behind the laugh.” She is one of the few black female television producers, and certainly one of the very few in comedy — and she’s one of the most successful. Hughes is the showrunner for Comedy Central’s new Hood Adjacent with James Davis. Most recently, she was the executive producer for Dave Chappelle’s acclaimed Netflix specials. And this fall she has the All Def Comedy series premiering on HBO.


What’s your primary social media tribe?

I’m really an Instagrammer. I get lost in Snapchat at times, and so, like, sometimes I send the wrong thing to the wrong person. Twitter is so much information — I get overloaded.

What is your favorite throwback TV show?

Hart to Hart. I just love the glamour of this romance, and they’re out there doing stuff. There’s a murder every episode, and somehow they solve it within 44 minutes, which is brilliant. They stay glamorous the whole time, and he’s [Robert Wagner’s character] just totally in love with her [Stefanie Powers’ character]. It’s truly just fun-filled, fantasy stuff.

“I credit my dad for never allowing fear to be a part of our life, or conversation.”

What’s the last show you binge-watched?

Totally a binge-watcher. I go from, like, from House of Cards to Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. I love the cleverness of the writing. House of Cards, it reminds me of the old West Wing days of really clever characters that are complex and layered and all those good things. You can root for the bad guy and not feel guilty. Unbreakable is just a guilty pleasure. I love it because I don’t have to think.

What do you think about the binge-watching TV culture that we have right now?

It’s a good thing because it creates a scenario where we have to continuously create content … we have to keep feeding the beast. So as a content creator, I’m excited for it — and nervous. I get excited because … I’m constantly in demand to create content. And then the nervous energy is that I’ve got to continue to create at a certain level.

What will you always be a champion of?

I’m always a champion of creativity and of protecting the creative voice. Voices are so important, and they’re distinctive. I’ve battled throughout my career for the voice to be there. And it’s not like, ‘Oh, I want to give a voice to the voiceless.’ It’s not that. It’s more of … I don’t have to agree with your politics or whatever, but I feel like voice is necessary. I would hate for us to be monolithic, a one-tone culture where everyone just kind of buys in to the same thing.

“I went to a Richard Pryor concert when I was really young. Because my uncle has worked at The Comedy Store.”

Who was your childhood hero?

My dad. He passed in 2007. My dad was one that always instilled in me that you have a choice: ‘You can always choose, Rikki.’ And no one can ever put you in a box, because all you have to do is stop, and you can stop at any point in time. It helped me navigate, in a fearless way. … I can look at a situation, but I don’t have to be in that situation. I credit my dad for never allowing fear to be a part of our life, or conversation.

Is that where your courage comes from?

It really does go back to my dad. There’s never been a ‘no’ for me. ‘No’ is just not a thing we say. It’s just another opportunity for a ‘yes’ somewhere else.

What was the first comedy concert you attended?

I went to a Richard Pryor concert when I was really young. Because my uncle has worked at The Comedy Store. I wasn’t supposed to be in there. I remember sitting on the side, and I had to sit in the hallway. I remember hearing — it was just electric, the way he could move people.

Is that what did it for you?

That definitely made me fall in love with the tale of telling stories on stage … engaging an audience in that way.

Is your life like a constant game of “make me laugh” once people know who you are?

Comics … more than anything, they always say, ‘If you can get Rikki to actually laugh, you’ve really won on stage!’

“I’m an L.A. girl, born and raised in L.A., so I just grew up around him. Fast breaks and Magic Johnson!”

Favorite athlete of all time?

Magic Johnson. He was so excited just to be in the game. It wasn’t about fame and money. I’m sure those things were great for him, but I always felt the genuine excitement, that he was just happy to be in the game, happy for people to be there, loved the fans. I felt like I always smiled when I watched him play. I’m an L.A. girl, born and raised in L.A., so I just grew up around him. Fast breaks and Magic Johnson!

Do you have a favorite athlete who’s playing right now?

I kind of like LeBron … I really appreciate the way he moves. I love integrity. It’s one of my biggest things. It’s the most attractive thing to me. So I feel like he has integrity and is able to speak boldly and clearly, and just own it, and I love that about him.

This conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

Jazmyn Simon is planning her real-life wedding to Dulé Hill, and loves hanging with her ‘brothers’ on HBO’s ‘Ballers’ But she still has time for political arguments, electric cars and breaking stereotypes

Enjoying a successful career? Check. Engaged to the man of her dreams? Check. Living her best life? Double check. Though the year has been a whirlwind for actress Jazmyn Simon, it’s one the 36-year-old co-star of the hit HBO series Ballers would not trade for the world. With the third season of Ballers underway, Simon is looking forward to showing viewers a different side of her character, Julie Greane, who has played the role of a supportive wife to Charles Greane (Omar Benson Miller), an ex-NFL player who struggles to find his identity off the football field.

“The first two seasons, [Julie] was really just Charles’ backbone, trying to help him decide what he’s supposed to do … and that definitely goes on in season three too,” Simon says of her character. “But this season, she kind of steps out on her own. You see her go to work for the first time, which is very important for me. [It’s] one thing to be a wife and another thing to be a mother, but it’s a whole other thing to be a wife, mother and have your own things. She’s a doctor, and many people don’t realize she’s a doctor because she never went to work.”

Life can get a bit hectic in Hollywood, but that doesn’t stop Simon from making time for the important things, including binge-watching her favorite shows, winning political arguments, and being engaged to and planning her wedding with fellow Ballers star Dulé Hill.

What’s your favorite part about playing Julie Greane?

I got to break a stereotype. It’s always good for a black woman to be able to break a stereotype. When you think of a football player’s wife, you automatically think of negative stuff, and you don’t really think that this is just a doctor who loves her husband and supports him no matter what he does. And that is the thing that I’m most proud of and most excited about, what the writers have done and what I’ve been able to do with this character.

What was one of the craziest moments you’ve had on set?

We had this one party scene last season and it was Ricky’s (John David Washington) birthday. They only showed a little of it, but I tell you, when you get all of us together, the whole cast and a whole bunch of people at a pool party, it gets weird. It’s a lot of shenanigans that go on when all of us are together in a party scene. Working with a bunch of guys is fun in general, but things get wild when all of us are together.

“I was telling them it was so fun to be out with my brothers, and Dulé was like, ‘So we’re clear, I’m not your brother.’ And now … he’s my fiancé.”

Are there any actors you’re closest to? Or are they all just treated like brothers?

Well, I’m engaged to one of them, so that one is definitely not my brother. It’s funny because 3 1/2 years ago when we first started shooting, I went out with all the guys … just a bunch of us. I was telling them it was so fun to be out with my brothers, and Dulé was like, ‘Just so we’re clear, I’m not your brother.’ And now 3 1/2 years later, he’s my fiancé. I love him. He’s the best. I’m the closest with Donovan Carter, who plays Vernon Littlefield. Me and Donovan are like siblings.

Have you ever been starstruck?

I very rarely get starstruck. I get excited. President Obama was the most starstruck I had been. He and Michelle Obama were everything. That meeting was just everything to me. I will tell you the first table read that I had for Ballers, the very first one after I booked it, they sat me directly across from Dwayne [Johnson], and the entire time I was in that table read my knees would not stop shaking. I kept thinking, ‘That is The Rock. Oh, my gosh.’ Like, come on. I still have to pinch myself and say, ‘Girl, you have Dwayne’s phone number. That’s The Rock. If you need to talk to him, you can just call.’ I was starstruck that day, and my blood pressure was probably very high. The awe has definitely worn off in 3 1/2 years just because I know him and I love him. He’s definitely a brother to me.

If you weren’t acting, what would you be doing?

Trying to act. My first job out of college was at HBO, so if I wasn’t on an HBO show, I’d probably be an executive at HBO. I was a sales assistant in the Chicago office. Full circle. Life is good in that way.

“So if you see me riding around town with my falcon doors, just say, ‘What’s up?’ “

Julie has great fashion sense, and I’m sure Jazmyn does, too. What’s your current fashion obsession?

Shout-out to Tiffany, our costume designer, because Julie’s clothes are always on point. And Jazmyn’s clothes are not as cool as Julie’s. I do like a nice pair of jeans though. I will spend some dollars on a pair of jeans. I’ll put on jeans with a white T-shirt and an expensive purse and call it a day. Jazmyn likes fashion, but she’s not wearing Alexander McQueen to cook dinner like Julie is. Julie is the baller. Jazmyn is on Ballers. See the difference there?

What’s the last show you binge-watched?

Oh my gosh. I have a couple. The Handmaid’s Tale was the bomb, but it wouldn’t let me binge it because Hulu is mean. They only made it once a week. Over Christmas break, I rewatched every episode of Game of Thrones because that is my all-time favorite. I can just watch Game of Thrones right now. But I’ve also been bingeing Sense8 and The Leftovers right now.

What will you always be the champ of?

Political arguments. I will always win a political argument. Always. Don’t come for me, because I feel like I’m Anderson Cooper. I know the most.

What is the worst purchase you ever made?

I’m gonna tell you the truth. I was in Vancouver shooting something and me, trying to be a baller, I was like, ‘I need some new sunglasses.’ So I bought these Christian Dior metallic, reflective sunglasses and they were like $700. And when I tell you those shades are in the bottom of my purse somewhere … I can’t wear those in real life. And every time I think about it, I get mad because I’m like, that $700 could’ve gone on something else. They’re in a purse somewhere in my closet.

And best purchase?

The most baller purchase I’m about to make is this Tesla X. I cannot wait. I’m ordering it in October, so hopefully I’ll have it in November. So if you see me riding around town with my falcon doors, just say, ‘What’s up?’

“Julie is the baller. Jazmyn is on Ballers. See the difference there?”

What are you looking forward to achieving in the rest of 2017?

Girl, I’m planning my wedding! I’m planning the wedding of my dreams so hopefully, after all this planning, I will achieve the perfect wedding. I love work, but love is so much better. Love is the best. I’m also auditioning for a movie, so hopefully I’ll book that too. Everybody put good vibes out there.

If you could go to dinner with one person, dead or alive, who would it be?

Beyoncé. I just need to know how she named the twins Rumi and Sir. And I have a question: Is it Sir Carter Carter or just Sir Carter? These are the questions I need to go to dinner with Beyoncé to ask her. Let’s put that out there. I’ll have a seat for her [at the wedding].

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Don’t forget who you are. Every day before I left my house — I lived with my grandmother until I was of age to move out on my own, and every day before I left, she said, ‘Don’t forget who you are.’ When you’re 10 years old you really don’t understand that, and when you’re 15 years old you don’t really understand that. But today, I understand that more than ever because I’m in a town full of actors and full of Hollywood executives, and this business is not for the faint of heart. And if you let people, they will take you out of yourself. They’ll make you something that you are not. So every day, before I leave the house, I say, ‘Do not forget who you are,’ and it keeps me humble, grounded and accountable for the decisions I make every day.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and length.

Sydelle Noel is making a splash in Netflix’s ‘GLOW’ The track star turned actress gets candid about Monopoly, her father and meeting Angela Bassett

Sydelle Noel is on the fast track to becoming one of the hottest actresses in Hollywood. Shortly after landing a small role in the highly anticipated Marvel movie Black Panther, Noel sprang into a challenging role as Cherry Bang, one of the featured wrestlers in Netflix’s latest original series, GLOW. It focuses on a group of women in 1980s Los Angeles who become the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling. “Cherry is sexy, she’s very physical, she knows what she’s capable of and actually says what’s on her mind,” said Noel. “She’s not afraid of anyone, not intimidated by anyone. And she’s badass. Who doesn’t want to play a badass?” Noel’s former focus was on becoming a star athlete at the University of Georgia, where she ran track on a scholarship. Unfortunately, a stress fracture changed all that. But it’s Noel’s athletic background that helps her on GLOW. “Anything that’s a challenge,” said Noel, “I like to … conquer it.” Below (among other things) she talks about her favorite real-life wrestlers — and about which actress almost brought her to tears.

Who is your favorite wrestler?

I grew up watching Hulk Hogan. As I got older, I think me and everybody else loved The Rock. The Rock was my all-time favorite. He took wrestling and made it his own. And now he’s one of the No. 1 actors in the world.

Are there any rituals you get into on set?

Every athlete has a type of music they listen to to get them to that place — I’m very similar with acting now. I still have my get-crunk music, I have my cry-to-me playlist. I have so many different playlists I listen to to get me where I need to be, and in the zone I need to be. When I’m in my trailer preparing my lines, sometimes I listen to jazz. Sometimes I listen to Uncle Luke before the scenes I’m doing.

“Every athlete has a type of music they listen to to get them to that place — I’m very similar with acting now.”

What were your top three songs?

Nina Simone’s ‘Feeling Good,’ Lil Jon [& The East Side Boyz], ‘Get Crunk,’ and Tracy Chapman’s ‘Give Me One Reason.’ I love throwbacks.

Which pro athlete would you never want to trade places with?

If I had to say never, and it’s not because of their athletic abilities, it would be Serena Williams. It’s because no one ever wants to see her fail, so she has the world on her shoulders. She’s playing for her and everybody. That’s a lot of pressure … when she loses, it’s like she lost for the world, not just for her. But, shoot, that body, her bank account, her skills — I would definitely trade places for that!

If you could go to dinner with one person, dead or alive, who would it be?

The first person that popped into my head is my dad. I lost my dad when I was 9, and I would drop everything, give up everything, for one last dinner with him.

Who would you want to play you in your biopic?

Right now, I would want to play myself! Twenty years from now I wouldn’t know, but right now, if they were like, ‘Sydelle, we’re going to do a film about you right now. Who would you want to play you?’ I’d be like, ‘Uh, no one’s playing me but me.’ Not only do you have to have the acting down, but you have to be physical and have the athletic background. There are a very few — a handful — of African-American girls out there in the entertainment world where we can act, be physical and actually do your own stunts. There’s not many of us out there.

What’s your favorite throwback television show?

Fresh Prince! I love The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. When it’s on, I always have to stop and watch it.

“I lost my dad when I was 9, and I would drop everything, give up everything, for one last dinner with him.”

What’s the last show you binged through?

Dear White People. I was sad that it was over. I actually didn’t know it was over. I was like, ‘Wait a minute. What?’ With Netflix, shows just literally go on. In 30 seconds the next episode just goes on, and you just need it. It was done and I was like, ‘What just happened?’

What will you always be the champion of?

I will always be the champion of Monopoly. Always. Hands down, no one can beat me in Monopoly.

Have you ever been starstruck?

I’m starstruck all the time. I ran into Laurie Hernandez. I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, you’re so cute! I love you!’ The most [starstruck] that I’ve ever been, and it really brought me to tears, is when I was working on Black Panther and I saw Angela Bassett. I went weak in the knees because I’ve always wanted to work with her. She’s one of my idols. Finding out she was so down to earth and chill and fun, it was amazing working with her. When we wrapped, I just had to go over and knock on her trailer and let her know how much it meant to me, and I almost started crying.

If you could go back in time, what would you tell your 15-year-old self?

I would tell her not to stress so much about the future, because the future will be just fine. I used to stress myself out, especially with … my track career. I used to stress myself out … and would have to tell myself to relax, and just go with the flow. Let things be. Things will always work out.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and length.