President Barack Obama, Chance the Rapper and Stephen Curry join forces in PSA for My Brother’s Keeper Alliance The MBK Alliance launches new ‘We Are the Ones’ campaign because it is everyone’s responsibility to help children succeed

A U.S. president, a superstar basketball player and a young top-charting rapper all have something in common. They are passionate about and committed to providing opportunities for young people. Every young person deserves a fair shot at success in life and former President Barack Obama, Stephen Curry and Chance the Rapper want to help spread the word.

On Monday, the trio has teamed up to participate in the public service announcement We Are the Ones, an urgent rallying cry to young Americans from all backgrounds to take action, join the conversation and join the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance (MBK Alliance). The call to action supports the mission of the MBK Alliance, the continued mission of Obama that every young person deserves equal opportunity to achieve success and prosperity regardless of the color of their skin, their gender or the neighborhood where they’re born.

The three are passionately striving to help Americans assume the responsibility to make sure every young person has an equal opportunity.

Launched in May 2015, MBK Alliance, also known as the alliance, is an extension of Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which was established nearly four years ago. The alliance has worked with communities, corporations, and local officials across the country to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. Late this year the alliance joined forces with the Obama Foundation to continue its work as a critical initiative of Obama’s.

Brought to you by the Obama Foundation, ESPN and The Undefeated, the “We Are the Ones” announcement shows the foundation’s commitment to the program as well as allies who believe in the mission of the alliance.

“I firmly believe that every child deserves the chances I had,” Obama said when he signed the initiative during his time in office.

It is the 44th president’s desire to continue to address the opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color. The MBK initiative was launched as a national movement that has inspired 250 cities, counties and tribal nations to accept the program.

During his last MBK event as president Obama said, “This will remain a mission for me and for Michelle, not just for the rest of my presidency, but for the rest of my life.”

The agreement between the alliance and the Obama Foundation means that the program is better equipped to prolong his vision that all children can reach their full potential no matter who they are or where they come from. It also addresses the opportunity gap for young men and boys of color. According the GuideStar, the Obama Foundation, launched in 2014, operates with more than $13 million in assets.

Early support of the MBK initiative included Kevin Durant, Alonzo Mourning, John Legend, Roc Nation, PepsiCo, American Express, BET and other educators, business leaders and officials.

Within the Obama Foundation, MBK Alliance focuses on building safe and supportive communities for boys and young men of color where they feel valued and have clear pathways to opportunity. MBK Alliance works to elevate the voices of our nation’s boys and young men of color and unite business, philanthropy, nonprofit, government, community leaders, and youth to impact lasting social change. This collaborative, cross-sector movement led by the MBK Alliance helps break down barriers that boys and young men of color disproportionately face and creates paths to promising futures.

There are many ways to get involved, including signing up to become a mentor and connecting with other local organizations in your city. Joining the alliance allows allies to unlock the organization’s Keepers’ Codes, a set of six principles created with young men of color across the country for their peer allies to learn and live by.

Spreading the word and sharing the Keepers’ Code provides an opportunity to raise awareness around the issues boys and young men of color face every day. The Keepers’ Code includes the following principles:

  • We will struggle for equity together, because the struggle belongs to all of us — not just some of us.
  • We will take ownership with urgency, because acting with urgency is proof that we share in the problem.
  • We will learn from our collective history, because we cannot create future solutions for all of us without understanding the past struggles of some of us.
  • We will be public about our beliefs and values, because if they are kept private — they do not exist.
  • We will uncover our personal biases, in order to challenge the biases in our social circles.
  • We will seek diverse points of view around every table, because if we don’t, our businesses and communities cannot thrive.

Why these three Dallas Cowboys players decided to get baptized in the team’s pool The exclusive story behind the touching viral video that took the internet by storm

FRISCO, Texas – Three members of the Dallas Cowboys decided to make a move that will forever alter their lives.

They got baptized. And it was videotaped.

But it wasn’t a typical video of a conventional baptism. What created a stir was that all three players got baptized in the Cowboys’ rehabilitation pool at the team’s swanky practice facilities.

Linebackers Anthony Hitchens and Justin March-Lillard, and safety Kavon Frazier had the honor of having the Cowboys’ team chaplain, Pastor Jonathan Evans, baptize them. By all accounts it is believed to be the first baptism at The Star, the Cowboys’ $1.5 billion headquarters and practice facility, which opened last year.

“We spend a lot of our time here [at the practice facilities],” March-Lillard told The Undefeated. “You’re more with the guys here than you are with your own family, so it’s like a family environment.

“We have our team chaplain, who kind of helped change our lives, and we wanted him to be able to have that honor, so we’re honored to have him to be the one who baptized us. This is kind of faith and football for us – it’s a lifestyle – so it all goes together.”

Frazier said about 15 teammates witnessed the baptisms, adding that the moment was surreal.

“For me, I got baptized at a young age, and I was always a believer, but I never really had a real relationship with God until now,” Frazier said. “So that’s why I just wanted to redo that, because now I actually have a relationship with him and I see what he’s doing in my life and I actually truly have faith.

“I think it brought our team a lot closer in that aspect, because we’re so used to seeing them cheering us on the field. But they were actually cheering us on at getting baptized in a whole different aspect of life.”

Running back Alfred Morris was one of the players in the room where the baptisms occurred and was left inspired by what he had just witnessed.

“Scoring touchdowns, making tackles, getting yards – that stuff is awesome and that stuff is temporary,” Morris said. “But making a decision like that, that’s forever, that’s eternal.

“It was huge for me to see that and to be able to witness that and I’m glad I got to, because it was awesome and I’m superexcited for those guys. I even put it on my social media I was so excited for those guys, because it’s a big step in life.”

It was a big step Hitchens was more than willing to take even though the baptisms didn’t occur in a traditional church.

“I was contemplating that I needed a church to go to in order to get baptized,” Hitchens said. “I just didn’t know it was going to end up like that.

“But it’s crazy how God put different people in your life. [Evans] came out of his way to come here on a Tuesday to baptize us, so it was just a blessing. It just happened out of nowhere.”

The video of the baptisms caught the players off guard when it went viral. Evans shared a two-minute clip on his Facebook page and it has been viewed nearly 6 million times.

Upon entering the pool, Evans read from 2 Corinthians 5:17, stating: “Therefore those who are in Christ are a new creation. The old has gone and the new has come.”

The players had no idea that a video of them turning their lives over to God would go viral.

“Going viral, that was God’s plan,” said Frazier, adding he got baptized real early in response to his mom’s demands. “He made it go viral just so we can use our platform in a whole bigger sense than just football.

“It wasn’t supposed to blow up, it just happened. We didn’t do it for the press. We did it to renew our vows with God.”

As word circulated around the Cowboys’ locker room about the baptisms, fullback Keith Smith was enjoying a spiritual awakening and explaining how his three teammates were starting over on life’s journey.

“I feel like those are three guys that are really on the right path, especially spiritually,” Smith said. “I feel like your faith plays a lot into your game, too, so just seeing them take that step is big-time.

“I heard it got a whole bunch of publicity, so it’s always a good thing to spread the word of God.”

March-Lillard, whose father and younger brother both died within the last 13 months, said that it was a no-brainer to get baptized at the Cowboys’ practice facilities. Especially since he’s noticed that some of his teammates have openly gravitated toward the word of God.

“Every Bible study, every conversation about the word of God, they were a part of it,” March-Lillard said. “So it was unique to see them not be afraid to share their beliefs.

“Our church is here, so for us it was kind of like that’s why we got baptized here, because this is our church, this is where we have Bible study.”

By bringing attention to God by getting baptized at The Star, Frazier hopes it will resonate with younger kids across the world. Particularly those kids, he said, who don’t think it’s cool to embrace God.

“They don’t see their friends really worshiping God and really talking about God,” Frazier said. “Even me growing up, I went to a Christian school all my life, but I really wasn’t going around talking about God.

“But now it’s different. Now I actually get it. I think it takes some time and people just have to grow up until they really build that relationship with God, but from this video, hopefully younger people will start learning [about God] a little bit quicker.”

March-Lillard said he gave his life to Christ three years ago. He added that the recent baptism was just icing on the cake for him and his two teammates.

“That was life-changing for us and we wanted to put that on display and to have that visualization about just what it means and how it feels to be reborn,” March-Lillard said. “It was a huge decision for all of us.

“We all backed each other up as well as everyone else in the locker room backed us up. So it was a big decision that we all made together.”

It’s a decision that all three players said they would repeat if they had to do it all over again. And they all strongly believe their baptism was designed to get athletes and people in all walks of life discussing its impact.

“It was amazing just seeing our teammates cheering us on, and it’s just amazing how much it blew up [on social media] and the platform that we can use just by getting baptized at our workplace,” Frazier said. “So now, younger kids might not be so nervous to come out of the closet in their faith.

“They may not think it’s the not-so-cool thing to do. It was all God’s plan to make it go viral.”

Brian Mays is using toothpaste to give back to his community The New Yorker is the founder and CEO of Smile Natural, which helps others while creating a healthier lifestyle

When Brian Mays combined holistic dental hygiene and philanthropy, he produced Smile Natural Toothpaste — a company that uses toothpaste to give back to the community.

Based in New York City, the Smile Natural team recently donated school supplies to students living in New York’s Lois Pink Houses public housing community – a deed that helps families in need past the normal first of the year school supply drive.

“Living in New York, I’d heard of the Pink Houses. They’re said to be one of the roughest housing projects here and were recently featured on the VICE network. Many of the kids living there go without access to necessary school supplies, so I wanted to make a special donation to them,” said 28-year-old Mays. “It’s easy to just cut a check to an organization, but sometimes, a lot of people are still left out. I wanted to make sure 100 percent of the donations went directly to families. Seeing the looks on the kids’ faces as we gave them gift bags of paper, pens, rulers, geometry sets and several other items they need for school, was one of the most fulfilling experiences I’ve ever had.”

While the organic ingredients (coconut oil, peppermint oil, cacao, activated charcoal and more) aid in Smile Natural’s uniqueness, it’s the investment in the community that sets this brand apart. For every purchase, a donation is made to a worthy cause.

“My first month in business, I donated 100 percent of the month’s sales to purchase school supplies for a Baltimore, Maryland, school in need. I’d recently learned that the middle school students there were lacking important materials, so it just made since to give them the donation,” Mays said.

Smile Natural has also raised enough money to award its first of many $500 scholarships to a high school student who shares the company’s love for giving back.

“Our scholarship is a little different in that we don’t focus on GPAs or grades, but we recognize students that go out of their way to give back to the community,” Mays said. “Our scholarship recipients may not be the best students, but we want to honor their work in philanthropy, in efforts to promote and encourage this characteristic in students early on.”

Reading about the Black Panthers’ commitment to community development was the inspiration behind incorporating the element of giving back in his business.

“Reading about them really encouraged me to take ownership in making sure the community is taken care of.”

Mays also attributes some inspiration to his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi, which highlights uplifting the community in its motto, as well as his parents.

“My parents raised my siblings and I to be grateful for everything we had. We didn’t have much, but it was instilled in us to give to others when we could. It’s always been a very gratifying feeling to be able to help someone else out.”

Mays never thought he’d start a toothpaste company, “I just took something everyone needs and made it healthier and more meaningful.

“It’s funny,” he added, “how things come full circle. I at one point wanted to be a doctor. I laugh when I think about how I’m still helping people with their health, just through their teeth.” One of his favorite parts of running the business is being able to use the marketing skills he learned as a student at the University of California, Santa Barbara to promote the company.

Research on fluoride and his dissatisfaction with existing toothpaste brands led to him take matters into his own hands and create a healthier alternative for everyone.

“I started to research fluoride and its harmful effects and decided to stop consuming it altogether,” Mays said. “Fluoride is found in most toothpastes, so I first just tried to switch to a natural brand. I tried out a popular natural toothpaste, but I hated how dry it made my mouth feel afterwards, so I started making my own. I combined a few quality, natural ingredients that made my mouth feel clean and eliminated that dry feeling. I let a few friends try it out and they loved it. That was the start of Smile Natural Toothpaste.”

If Mays weren’t making his original toothpaste by hand, he’d be a strategy consultant.

“I’ve learned so much on this journey and I’d love to one day help other entrepreneurs with their business models.”

Until then, Mays said, he will continue whipping up his must-have, natural toothpaste and helping out those in need along the way.

Jennifer James turns setbacks into success with plus-size activewear line Active Ego The brand was featured in New York Fashion Week and offers options for the WNBA Dallas Wing’s plus-size fans

When Jennifer James founded the plus-size activewear brand Active Ego, she didn’t know the brand’s continued success would take her all the way to New York Fashion Week and become part of the Dallas Wings. But through dedication, hard work and an unrelenting devotion, it’s reached masses beyond her farthest dreams.

After having her first child in 2013, the Dallas native went into full gym mode to lose her baby weight and noticed a lack of fashionable activewear for plus-size women. James had no formal training or experience in the apparel industry, but she decided to start designing and creating her own durable fashion-forward pieces as a hobby, and the Active Ego brand was born.

In 2016, James was downsized. She worked in the IT business as a business analyst as well as a project manager, implementing electronic health record systems for hospitals and insurance companies.

“I did that, I would say, for a good five to six years before I realized that that just wasn’t a passion of mine,” James said. “So, it wasn’t long after I had my daughter I decided to jump out of the business and pursue the brand.”

The “mompreneur’s” primary mission with Active Ego is to “empower today’s woman to embrace an active and healthy lifestyle, while looking and feeling phenomenal in stylishly flattering apparel.” Since James launched the brand, her line has been showcased at New York Fashion Week, partnered with Neiman Marcus Last Call as its only plus-size activewear brand, and has partnered with the Dallas Wings for the first plus-size WNBA fan apparel collection.


What was your inspiration for starting the brand?

When I was pregnant with my daughter, I gained quite a bit of weight. And, I just really wanted to be able to work out and feel great in just activewear, athleisure wear that I felt like was empowering, that was full of color, full of personality. And, when you’re considered plus-size, which is typically a 12 or anything above, your options are very limited. What inspired me is the fact that, here I am, I didn’t feel like I was old. I was still young, and I just wanted to feel that way when I was working out, and didn’t want to have boring colors, such as the whites, a lot of the sports bras are white, gray and black, and just really dull and lifeless. I just really thought that there was really nothing out there in the markets, or any brands dedicated to this underserved margin of women, and so I just kind of stepped out there and did my own thing.

How did you start the process?

I pumped into high gear with just designing and of figuring out different fabrics and things that I felt would look great, even at the size I was, so I could enjoy my fitness experience a lot better. I work with a manufacturing company in Los Angeles to do a lot of my sewing for the different styles that we have. Our designers and everything are in-house here [Dallas], but depending on the number of units, we definitely work with the company in Los Angeles to do all of the sewing and mailing out of the styles.

How many people are part of the Active Ego team?

We have a team of seven here locally, and then of course our production team ranges anywhere between 10 to 15 people.

How many hours are you personally dedicating to the daily operations?

Oh, my gosh! All the hours. It feels like. But, honestly, when you’re going on this whole entrepreneurship journey, most people think you have a product, it’s going to sell a million dollars, put in two years and that’s it. People really don’t like to sit in the process, because it’s long, nothing’s guaranteed, and it’s lots of hours. I just couldn’t even imagine how many hours, so I would tell you that it’s a balance. And, I’m a wife, I’m a mom, and I’m an entrepreneur. So, between that you don’t really have a set amount of hours. There’s been some days where I’m working 16 to 18 hours, and then there’s some where I work a little lighter, eight to 10 hours. It just depends on what needs to get done and just kind of how strong your team is.

How do you balance being an entrepreneur, a mother and a wife?

I don’t think there’s a balance. No one ever told me that. To be honest, it’s all about how flexible you are, it’s not really about balance, I feel, in a lot of areas. When I’m working on my brand, or dealing with the children, I may be missing out on time with my husband, or vice versa. I just have to try not to fail too much in the same area, that’s kind of how I look at it. But, I’m human. I think that balancing is just overrated. You just kind of have to prioritize some things, and you have to sacrifice some things and sometimes you have to be a little selfish. It really is hard when people say balancing, it’s something you have to just know how to switch gears and be flexible, I would say.

How would you describe your method of switching gears and staying flexible?

I sacrifice a lot of sleep in order to get everything done, typically. I make sure that I stay organized, I have a schedule. I call it the ‘Discipline Schedule,’ where I’m just kind of every hour of the day I’m just kind of doing something, gearing towards the goal for the day. Or, if I have to-do lists, like anybody else, that I’m OK not getting through the list for the day, or even some of the time for a week, or even carrying some things over. I make it a point to be mentally, physically, and spiritually in shape.

What’s been the hardest part of your journey thus far?

When you feel like you’re the only person that kind of sees this vision, you’re trying to convince everyone else to kind of get on board, whether that’s people that you’re hiring. I think just believing in what you’re doing is very important to me. I think the hardest part has been, not making the samples, not making the material, but really just getting the message out there, especially with me being in the plus-size world for women. A lot of women do not identify themselves as plus-size, even if they know that they’re plus-size. It’s almost like this category you don’t want to be in. But, what they don’t realize is that’s the norm these days. I question what plus-size really is. So, I think the hardest part for me, but the most enjoyable, is just being able to provide tangible options for these plus-size women, that they feel empowered in, that they feel great in, that they don’t feel ashamed of wearing, and, that actually provide them a secure fit, and a different mindset in a way of thinking.

How did you get to New York Fashion Week?

I believe it was God’s timing. I was let go of the project that I was working on the end of July, and I remember feeling just kind of like a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. At the time I had been doing Active Ego just kind of as a hobby on the side for about a year at that time. So, me being let of the project only gave me the opportunity to be 100 percent at what I was doing. And, I felt like I was ready at the time.

I will never forget, I was sitting in Chick-Fil-A, and I was working and eating, and I received an email from Curvy Magazine. And, it had mentioned that they had been following my social media accounts, and they wanted to see if I was open to participating in the New York Fashion Week last year, and to see if I would mind showcasing a few of my items. Well, at this time it was so funny because I wasn’t even at a 100 percent having inventory, so of course I had samples and I had items, but I wasn’t a full functioning machine.

The theme of the show was ‘Body Image,’ so it just worked well with everything. And, so from then on, I think about eight weeks later, I flew up to New York. I was able to showcase my items, speak about my brand, actually, and things have been moving really fast ever since.

Who has been your biggest cheerleader throughout the process?

Let me start by saying, I do have a lot of cheerleaders. There’s been days that I just want to pull my hair out. But, I would say my husband has been my biggest encourager. He’s an entrepreneur himself, and for him to be able to relate and for me being able to talk to him about certain things. Even when I’m feeling down, or things are going great, he really just keeps me humble and keeps things in perspective.

What future goals do you have?

Wow. I have so many I’m trying to tackle at once. But, I will say that just some of the things we have coming up and future goals, just with the brand I want to be just a nationwide brand that’s dedicated to customer service and great styles and great fit, to be honest with you. I want to be the partner of choice for these plus-size, curvy women’s activewear and athleisure wear. I definitely feel like having a brand dedicated specifically to that category of clothing would be amazing.

LaMonica Garrett hauled himself from a stalled football career to a successful acting career His fast-forward into acting became one of his best decisions

Sometimes one’s dreams for success come true in completely unexpected ways.

Such was the case for athlete-turned-actor LaMonica Garrett.

The high school quarterback was a standout. He went on to junior college and landed a scholarship to Central State in Ohio. Now, however, Garrett is not gracing a field but the screen as Secret Service agent Mike Ritter on ABC’s political drama Designated Survivor.

The series centers on a lower-level U.S. Cabinet member who is suddenly appointed president of the United States after a catastrophic attack kills everyone above him in the presidential line of succession. Garrett shines as the man charged with protecting the new president in the wake of the unprecedented bombing. To prepare for the role, he spent time choppin’ it up with the Secret Service detail from then-President Barack Obama’s staff.

“I always knew that I wanted to act, but I had an equal passion for football too,” said Garrett. “I grew into middle linebacker, where I got my first looks from team scouts. Central State’s Pro Day the year before had Hugh Douglas [New York Giants defensive end], who became the Defensive Rookie of the Year, so the following year, half the NFL came out to find the next Hugh Douglas. I worked out for a couple of teams and tried out again the next year, but it didn’t work out, so I realized my football career wasn’t going to go any further.”

Garrett’s dream was to play football for six or seven years and move straight into acting.

“I trained with a few NFL teams, but it didn’t work out, so that just moved up my timeline to pursue acting.”

Garrett was named after football legend Daryle LaMonica. His athletic skills would take him to Central State, where he played two seasons as linebacker and left college early to pursue an NFL career. Shortly after moving to Los Angeles, the San Francisco native signed up for acting classes. He worked as a FedEx driver during that time, and coincidentally, his route included the Warner Bros. lot.

He made a detour in his acting career when he fell into the sport of slam ball, where he competed globally. However, coming full circle, he shortly landed a three-episode guest role as a slam ball antagonist on the television show One Tree Hill. And since then, he’s been laser-focused on acting and getting gigs in television and film, including Sons of Anarchy, NCIS, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, and Daddy’s Home, to name a few.

Ahead of hitting the gym, Garrett caught up with The Undefeated.


What did you learn about yourself playing Mike Ritter in Designated Survivor?

Mike Ritter is disciplined and his fortitude is compassion. I see a lot of that in myself. I’m learning from him as well as finding out different things about myself. When you’re reading and researching your character, you sometimes begin to identify more than you realize. As actors, you can’t really judge the character. You just have to tell the story.

How did you prepare for that role?

We took a trip to the White House last October and I got to meet some of the Secret Service detail that was on President Barack Obama’s staff. It was great picking their brains firsthand. It doesn’t get better than that.

You starred in the short film The Duke, that tells the story of J.P. Duke, who suffered multiple concussions in the NFL. What are your thoughts on concussions and the NFL?

CTE [chronic traumatic encephalopathy] is troubling. Finding out what the NFL knew before they disclosed it … it’s just not good business or good ethics. Give the players the chance to make their own decision with all of the information. I’m sure a lot of them will still play, but you just have to be upfront with people. There shouldn’t be any gray area for health care for former football players, either. They should be taken care of for the rest of their lives no matter what. It should just be automatic. This applies for veterans too that are coming back from the war. There shouldn’t even be a discussion.

Who is your favorite athlete of all time?

Bo Jackson.

What surprised you most about acting that you had to overcome?

I grew up in a strong military house, so we weren’t really taught vulnerability. It was, ‘Are you hurt or injured, suck it up,’ ‘Don’t cry or show pain.’ Because of that, the hardest hurdle for me was to become vulnerable with myself. If you don’t know yourself, how can you jump into someone else’s skin and portray them on camera? It was a deep study of self and that was probably the most challenging for me. But acting classes really helped me with that.

How did you find inspiration as a FedEx driver?

Everyone loves the FedEx guy. Whenever I would come on set for a delivery, the prop guys and set designers would invite me to have lunch. I didn’t really tell any of the folks on set that I wanted to be an actor. In my head, I felt like they might look at me funny. I just kept it to myself, but I was still very inspired by just being in that environment.

Sometimes I’d see some of my buddies from acting class who would have a guest role on shows like The Jamie Foxx Show. It pushed me even harder. You see it and know it’s attainable. It’s so close, yet so far. But I knew if I stuck around long enough and put in the work, I’d get my shot.

How did you like your first acting gig with One Tree Hill as a slam ball athlete?

I fell into slam ball by accident because initially I thought it was an audition for a TV show, but instead it was for a traveling team. Apparently, I still had this inner competitiveness and athleticism that I didn’t have out of my system yet. We played in different cities and overseas, so that put my acting career on hold.

One Tree Hill was doing a three-episode arc with one of their lead characters who joined slam ball, so they needed a slam ball player who would be the antagonist. They were about to audition different actors and I was like, ‘Wait a minute, I’ve taken acting classes. Give me a shot!’ They let me audition and I got it. After shooting, I told slam ball I was done, signed up for another acting class and began booking more and more acting gigs.

How did playing football help you with acting?

Not to take criticism to heart, because it can be constructive if you use it the right way. I always say that it’s OK to have a chip on your shoulder as long as it’s constructive. Tom Brady still finds a way to motivate himself; Michael Jordan did too, even late in his career because of that constructive chip on his shoulder.

How do you make time to work out while filming?

I take advantage of days off. Days that I’m working, I’ll hit the gym for no more than an hour. Days that I’m not too busy, I’ll go to yoga too. It keeps me balanced and anchors me.

Who is your favorite superhero?

John Stewart, the Green Lantern. As a kid, I gravitated toward him because he was a normal guy just like Bruce Wayne as Batman and Peter Parker as Spiderman. I felt like I could be any of those superheroes by either finding a ring that gave me powers, becoming rich and buying cool tech or getting bit by a spider and getting spidey powers. All of that seemed attainable because I wasn’t from Krypton like Superman or Asgard like Thor.

How do you give back to Los Angeles?

My friend and I run a program in L.A. where we act as big brothers to kids who don’t have both parents in their life. We take them out, play ball and just become a familiar male figure in their lives. It’s very fulfilling.

Figure Skating in Detroit is aiming to change the color of the sport This girls-only program uses figure skating to build self-esteem and academic achievement

Asked recently which event she was more excited about — the 2018 Winter Olympics or the recently released Tonya Harding biopic I, Tonya — 13-year-old figure skater Kendyll Martin quickly said the Olympics. After all, she hadn’t even been born when Nancy Kerrigan was assaulted at Cobo Arena and wasn’t familiar with arguably the most dramatic moment in figure skating history.

Her dad, Carl Martin, chuckled. He remembered it, but he and his family are focused on how figure skating can be more widely available in communities of color.

Kendyll was introduced to the sport in kindergarten through a program at her private school. But she is more the exception than the rule. Many black girls, in Detroit and elsewhere, have not been exposed to the sport or its benefits.

Figure Skating in Detroit (FSD) is aiming to change this. The girls-only program is an offshoot of New York’s Figure Skating in Harlem, which uses figure skating to develop leadership skills, self-esteem and academic achievement.

Kendyll’s mother, Robin Martin, learned of FSD on the news and took Kendyll to a free workshop. Kendyll, who had stopped skating because her school’s program had been dismantled, was excited to have an opportunity to get back on the ice. Her parents were pleased with the program’s focus on skating, education and leadership.

Applicants are required to be Detroit residents and undergo an interview. Geneva Williams, director of Figure Skating in Detroit, uses the interview to determine the quality most important to her and the program: commitment.

In exchange for the time commitment — roughly two hours per day, four days a week — and maintaining at least a B average in school, the girls receive ice skates, uniforms, mentoring and on-ice instruction. Parents are asked to participate as well. Williams doesn’t just want them to provide transportation and fees, she wants them to attend some of the workshops.

The cost to the family is about $250, which covers instructor’s fees, costumes and equipment, and skates. Anyone who can’t swing that amount is asked to pay what they can. The Michigan Women’s Foundation, individual donors and other local foundations subsidize most of the program’s expenses. Williams’ goal is to get 300 girls to join by the end of 2018.

“I was impressed and excited that they offered skates,” said Robin Martin, although Kendyll hasn’t taken advantage of this yet. She still uses skates that were purchased before she joined FSD. Robin added that the cost to join the yearlong program is equivalent to what she would have paid for one or two private lessons.

She’s right. The cost of figure skating can be can be stifling, and it is likely part of the reason there aren’t more black figure skaters. A new pair of figure skates can start at $500. Add coaching costs, ice time and outfits and the tab can jump to $10,000 just for a low-level skater. This is steep for most families, let alone those living in Detroit, where the median household income is just above $26,000.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, 52 girls travel to Jack Adams Arena in northwest Detroit to skate. They range in age from 6 to 15, and Williams suspects most have never practiced the sport before.

“They are learning wiggles and basic skills,” reported Kendyll. More advanced skaters, like herself, work on spins and jumps. Her favorite is the loop jump and the scratch spin.

The girls are divided into four groups based on skill level. Besides on-ice instruction, they receive off-ice training in ballet, jazz, choreography and expression.

On Mondays and Wednesdays, the girls are separated by age and participate in a program called I Can Excel (ICE).

“I take classes like financial literacy, life skills, STEM and dance,” said Kendyll. Nutrition and tutoring are also offered on these days.

Barb Reichert, spokeswoman for the U.S. Figure Skating Association, likes all of it. “I admire how Figure Skating in Detroit puts a laser focus on education and then provides the support to be successful in the classroom and beyond,” she said by email.

Gary Miron, a professor in the College of Education and Human Development at Western Michigan University, is also excited about the program.

“Kids engaged in extracurricular activities tend to perform better than kids who don’t,” he said. Students who compete in gymnastics, cross-country and track tend to have high GPAs, he said, and figure skating would probably fit into this group of sports tied to high academic performance.

Williams added that understanding the physics of figure skating can help girls understand physics generally. It is these connections between sports and science that fortify her belief in the program.

Another benefit for the participants is the backing of Olympian Meryl Davis. The 2014 ice dancing Olympic champion is not competing in Pyeongchang, but she has been promoting both programs in Harlem and Detroit. She visits and gives skating tips to the girls from time to time.

Kendyll has met Davis a few times, and the encounters leave her somewhere between dazzled and intrigued. Still, she’s not interested in pursuing ice dance. Instead, Kendyll hopes to learn more complex jumps and spins so she can compete. FSD does not train girls for competition, so she’d have to join or partner with a figure skating club to do so.

Williams is not opposed to helping the girls compete, but right now she’s trying to secure funding and participants to ensure the longevity of the program. And Figure Skating in Detroit may be just as helpful to its lead organizer as it is to the girls who enroll. Williams was caring for her sick husband when she first heard about the program. When he died, Williams needed to grieve and find something she was passionate about professionally and emotionally. Though she is not a figure skater, FSD has helped spark the next iteration of her career.

The Detroit area attracts some of the most elite skaters and coaches in the world. This has been true since the 1960s, a long time before Little Caesars Arena was scheduled to host the U.S. Figure Skating National Championships in 2019.

But while black folks make up most of the Motor City’s population, only a small fraction appear to be members of the figure skating clubs around the region. The United States Figure Skating Association, the national governing body for the sport, does not track the race of competitors. Pictures from ice shows and competitions are the best evidence that black skaters exist.

All of this — the population, the number of skating rinks in the city, the figure skating talent, the need — is why Figure Skating in Harlem chose Detroit as an expansion city for the program last November.

This NFLPA exec’s passion is helping players prepare for life after the NFL Dior Ginyard is back in sports and motivated to pay it forward after surviving a brain injury

At the NFL Players Association office in Washington, D.C., Dior Ginyard spends his time helping players reach their full potential after they leave the game. Because the transition isn’t always smooth, the 29-year-old player development manager believes it’s his mission to help others develop the readiness skills for their second act.

Ginyard finds passion in this role because the young executive believes it is his fate. He’d had aspirations to play professional football, but that dream was stalled after a life-threatening brain injury.

It was on Dec. 3, 2006, that his life changed completely. The 18-year-old freshman at Frostburg State University in Maryland participated in a flag football game with some teammates the day the season was over. He hadn’t played all year. He was rehabbing from a thorny shoulder.

Then the unthinkable happened. Ginyard, admittedly playing too aggressively, viciously collided head-on with another player. The next thing he can remember was waking up in a helicopter not even knowing what day it was.

“I fractured my skull, and it’s like breaking glass. It breaks into pieces,” Ginyard said. “My skull pierced my brain and was causing my brain to swell up. That’s how you’re supposed to go brain-dead. I was flown to a hospital in Pennsylvania, where I had brain surgery.”

He suffered some memory loss, and it was hard to concentrate on things he was used to doing daily without a moment’s thought. During his rehabilitation process, which included physical therapy and counseling, he decided to transfer to Bowie State University, where he majored in communications.

“I was still dealing with the ramifications of my head injury, so I dealt with the depression, the anger, all the things that come with losing something that I thought was going to happen, big dreams,” he said. “So I spent a couple years figuring out what else I wanted to do.”

Ginyard said writing helped him cope with his transition and he figured out his passion. Eight filled journals later he knew he wanted to become a communicator and use his innate, previously undiscovered ability to help others in sports.

He graduated from Bowie State on Dec. 16, 2011, and landed an internship at Lockheed Martin in the communications department. After one year, Ginyard was hired full time and also pursued a master’s degree in marketing management from the University of Maryland University College.

He then decided it was time to make his presence known in professional sports. The Prince George’s County, Maryland, native researched jobs in the D.C. area and noted the NFLPA as an option. Scouring the organization’s website for opportunities, he saw a lone position for a player development manager.

“The first sentence said, ‘This role helps players transition to life after football,’ ” Ginyard recalled.

He believed he’d found the perfect match.

“I’m like, Wow. Now I have a position that helps players transition, and I had to deal with a transition of hitting rock bottom, and then dealing with the aftereffects of depression and anger, the trials and tribulations in trying to get back on my feet. I thought, ‘I can help from an experience perspective.’ ”

Ginyard has been with the players association for three years, overseeing its externship program that provides players with internship opportunities.

“I’m helping guys go back to school to finish their degrees and pursue secondary education,” he said. “It’s helping guys develop off the field, professionally. I love it, just the relationships. I’ve been able to build with these guys. I’m not working with the Tom Bradys and the Odell Beckhams; I’m working with the guy that’s going to need a second career. I’m one person in their ecosystem of friends and managers and agents. I want to give them something.”

Ginyard said the hardest part of his journey has been overcoming some challenges he’s faced.

“I had to learn how to deal with those emotions, not growing up with having a father there, not really knowing what to do with my anger and depression. I’m still managing that, and finding out what was going to replace the passion I had of playing football,” Ginyard said.

After his father left, he grew up with his mother and two siblings. Football was his outlet.

“I would say the biggest challenge for me is like, [understanding] what is this stereotype about a black man that had a brain injury, that his father’s not in his life, that was raised by a single mom, that went to HBCU [historically black college or university]? What does the world say about a person like that?

“Instead of harping on it, I use it as a chip on my shoulder. I want to prove everybody wrong because I know what society says about somebody like me. I want to be that person that stands up for other young black kids in my community and says, ‘Hey, you can make it without playing in the NFL.’ ”

Ginyard was recently featured as part of this year’s Forbes 30 Under 30.

“I’m honored to be on that list for a role that’s nonrevenue-generating. I’m not in sales, I’m not in business development, I’m not an agent, I’m not an athlete. I work in professional development. I think I’m glad I can be a representation for what we’re doing for our players and our members.”

He’s also raising his 3-year-old son, Carter.

Watch this 16-year-old find out he is going to Harvard Ayrton Little and his classmates celebrate his acceptance and it goes viral

When 16-year-old Ayrton Little learned that he had been accepted at Harvard University in front of family, friends and classmates at T.M. Landry College Preparatory in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, celebratory mayhem erupted.

The Opelousas, Louisiana, native posted the video to his Twitter account on Tuesday, and lots of people have joined Little in celebrating.

This is the third consecutive year a student from T.M. Landry has been accepted into an Ivy League university. The high school is noted for its rigorous academic program, and its student body has a 100 percent acceptance rate into four-year colleges and universities.

“Harvard has always been my dream school,” Little told HuffPost. He plans to study math and computer science.

His older brother, Alex, was accepted at Stanford University a few days earlier, and his video documenting the moment is posted on Twitter as well. Ayrton skipped a grade and will turn 17 in February, so both brothers are high school seniors. (A younger brother, who died after an asthma attack five years ago, would have been 13 this year.)

“It still haven’t been calm since my brother’s acceptance Friday, but my brother and I realized that we have done the impossible,” Ayrton said. “Many of my classmates are also getting their decisions this week. I honestly don’t know when the excitement will die down at this point.”

“Seeing Ayrton also doing it,” Alex told WBUR, “those goals we set for each other kind of caused us to become real competitive and push each other to do the best we can.”

Their mother, Maureen Little, a culinary teacher and a single mom, said she is proud of her sons. The two always “brought home good grades,” she said.

The brothers told WBUR they plan to develop nonprofit organizations that will help other students.

Caleb Green reads 100 books in one day while parents stream it on Facebook A passion for learning prompts the 4-year-old to turn a snow day into a goal day

Caleb Green is all about goal-setting, and he’s only 4 years old. When the young Chicago resident told his parents during a snow-filled weekend that he wanted to read 100 books in one day, his father, Sylus Green, felt it was a little ambitious and tried to talk the number down. But Caleb was set on 100.

Caleb and his parents set out on a hunt throughout the home Dec. 9 to gather reading material, but they did not have 100 books. Family and friends pitched in until they met the book number, and Caleb’s book marathon was born.

His father, Sylus, posted on Facebook that he’d read nine books the night before and he wanted to increase that number by 10 times more.

“One hundred is a LOT of books, son, do you know how long it will take?” Sylus Green wrote.

Caleb replied, “Yes. I want to read 100.”

“I like to read, and I want to read some more like my sister,” Caleb told ABC7 News.

The Greens began to livestream Caleb’s quest on Facebook, and Caleb finished with a victory dance after every 10 books read. The hashtag #CalebReads100 inspired thousands of viewers to tune in. Three videos and more than eight hours later, Caleb’s challenge to himself and his family was a wrap.

Sylus Green said people who didn’t have Facebook accounts signed up just to witness Caleb’s victory and encourage him throughout the day. He told ABC 7 he is inspired by Caleb and his tenacity had encouraged him to set goals of his own.

“I learned to just dream bigger, and I am going to set unrealistic goals for myself this coming year, and I’m going to be inspired by Caleb to not quit on him and just push through it,” Green said.

Caleb’s goals include becoming an astronaut when he’s 22 and a Ninja Turtle at 23. His favorite books are about Ninja Turtles.

When Caleb reached book No. 84, he sat in his mother’s lap while his father livestreamed the final stretch.

“Our superhero/dancing machine is finishing strong he is on book 84!!! Join us for the last 10 as we count down!!! #calebreads100#Brijchicago #Loveblack,” Sylus Green posted.

MGM National Harbor has proved to be all for the community and more than a resort in one year With job creation, community engagement, minority partnerships and philanthropy, the destination has proved to be more than a resort

When the D.C.-Maryland-Virginia area learned of MGM National Harbor’s influx into the community, there was both excitement and apprehension. Now, one year and 6 million patrons later, the goals set by Prince George’s County, the establishment’s home location, have been met. Job creation, community engagement, minority partnerships and philanthropy are on the rise.

Nightclubs, restaurants, shops, meeting rooms and a 24-story hotel and casino make up the resort. Marcus Wigfall, just 30 years old, was working in the accounting field. He loves playing poker, and as he watched the construction phase of the building, he grew more and more excited to hit the casino. But, as the Dec. 8, 2016, opening date grew near, he’d decided on a different plan. In search of a part-time job, he applied for a busser position at the location’s TAP Sports Bar and landed the gig. Two months after it opened, he was promoted to a full-time position with benefits.

“I would say maybe in a full month’s time I had moved up to a server. Around March, the food and beverage director came and talked to me,” Wigfall said.

The director informed Wigfall of an assistant manager position. He applied and was promoted again.

“I’m sitting as assistant manager. I’m actually working on becoming a general manager, and that’s looking very bright in my future right now,” Wigfall said. “I really appreciate everybody at MGM. I remember the first day when we got there, it was like a big parade for all the employees. I never had that before. Never had that experience, all the bigwigs or the higher people high-fiving me. Why are they high-fiving me? I haven’t even done anything, but that was motivation. That was something I had never seen before, a different feeling. I was enthused to come to work every day, and I still am.”

Wigfall graduated from Saint Augustine’s College in Raleigh, North Carolina, where he earned a degree in sociology and moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to the Washington, D.C., area in 2010.

“MGM has been one of the biggest opportunities that I have ever experienced. I’m here, and it’s still mind-blowing to me. I talk to my daughter, and every time my kids ride past MGM, they’d be like, ‘Dad, you work in that big building over there?’ I take pride in it. It’s a good feeling just having your kids watch you, and your wife, and your parents, and everybody looking at you like, ‘You did it. You really did it.’ And I’m not done.”

When MGM decided to build in Prince George’s County, resort executives along with the local government signed a community benefits agreement (CBA) that consisted of specific requirements and expectations from the county to achieve over time.

“We’re really proud that we have met or exceeded every single goal that was set forth in the CBA of things like employment,” said Prince George’s County native and junior vice president of government affairs Kerry R. Watson. “Prince George’s County is a majority minority county. Lot of black and brown people live here, and the CBA sets a goal of 40 percent employment by Prince George’s residents, and we’re extremely excited that we actually are at around 47 percent. We were not asked to reach close to 50 percent until after five years, and we are moving quickly toward that direction.

“To be able to provide opportunities like Wigfall’s to Prince Georgians who just took a chance with this company and have achieved so much, to me is some of our best stories,” Watson said.

The company employs 3,700 resort staffers, with 47 percent of the workforce from Prince George’s County.

In one year, MGM is the highest-grossing casino in Maryland, with revenue of $600 million. It has consistently been the largest contributor to Maryland’s Education Trust Fund, adding more than $170 million. MGM has contributed more than $17 million to local impact grants in 2017 alone and has provided more than $1 million in philanthropic contributions to institutions including Prince George’s County Community College, Bowie State University, the University of Maryland, College Park, and the Community Foundation of Prince George’s County. MGM invested approximately $6 million in improvements to the former Thomas Addison Elementary School in Prince George’s County, where it will be available for community use beginning in 2018.

MGM is strongly committed to supporting women-owned and minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs) in Maryland. They have dished out more than $367.9 million to MBE-certified companies, awarded contracts to 170 MBEs during construction and paid more than $158 million to Prince George’s County Minority Business Enterprises.

“To actually work for a company that sincerely takes these efforts to heart, it’s been a big thing,” Watson said.

Employees are committed to giving back to the community. In September, the resort opened its doors to the nonprofit organization in which they are involved to meet and greet the staff.

“[We wanted them] to talk to the employees directly about what their organization does for the community,” said Danielle White, regional vice president of community engagement. “Without us telling employees, ‘Here are great organizations that you can volunteer at,’ the organizations came here and were able to connect directly with the employees themselves. Some of them signed up to volunteer with them, some of them wanted more information, because one of the other ways that we have to do is through the MGM Foundation.”

More than 5,088 volunteer hours have been put in by 526 employees.

“This is before, we had not even firmly launched our volunteer program. We launched our volunteer program probably in September, so most of those hours were just our employees taking initiative and getting out and doing street team volunteer activities. Those are pretty large numbers so far, and I think it’ll be much higher next year,” White said.