Talking Shaq: Is he the new ‘Arsenio Tall’? The NBA Hall of Famer fills in for Jimmy Kimmel — is this a future look for Shaquille O’Neal?

NBA Hall of Famer Shaquille O’Neal filled in for Jimmy Kimmel on ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel Live! on Monday night, as the show’s star took a week off for his son’s heart surgery. The show will have a series of guest hosts while he is gone. O’Neal’s guests were Mila Kunis and Aisha Tyler. Did you know O’Neal recorded a platinum album? The proof, and all of the details, are here.

For the culture: Dodgers and Astros should embrace their cities’ personalities in World Series If sports are a melting pot, why isn’t that reflected in all aspects of the stadium experience?

Alls my life I had to fight/Hard times like, “God!”/ Bad trips like, “Yeah!”/ … But if God got us, then we gon’ be alright!

— “Alright” by Kendrick Lamar


With Game 2 of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Houston Astros tied 3-3 heading into the middle of the ninth inning, the Dodgers DJ finally picked a song representative of the situation and of the city where the game was being played.

After spending three days at Dodger Stadium for the pre-World Series media scrum, Game 1 and Game 2, I hadn’t heard much music that originated from the City of Angels.

I heard a lot of Top 40 music — don’t get me wrong, I like that mix — but that music can be played anywhere. In a region that produced the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Dom Kennedy, Dr. Dre, YG, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Tupac Shakur and N.W.A. (artists representative of the city’s toughness, swagger and finesse), why did it take pitcher Kenley Jansen giving up a game-tying home run to the Astros’ Marwin Gonzalez on an 0-2 pitch to tap into that? Picking “Alright” by Lamar, who’s from Compton, California, after the team gave up its 3-1 lead was a smart and timely decision.

Outside of the home runs and scores the Dodgers put on the board, the loudest I heard the crowd in that stadium was when Jansen came out of the bullpen to Shakur’s “California Love” (or Kenleyfornia Love, as he calls it) and when the Dodgers fought back from a 5-3 deficit in the 10th inning and the DJ dropped Dr. Dre’s “Next Episode,” when Los Angeles tied it up, 5-5, going into the 11th. The Astros ended up winning 7-6.

Houston went with a heavy dose of country, rock and Top 40 hits to keep the crowd engaged in Games 3 and 4. Frankly, fans were the loudest when “God Bless America” was played — and the team followed with “Deep in the Heart of Texas.”

Otherwise, the music at Minute Maid Park was almost background noise. It didn’t excite often and certainly didn’t offend. It definitely didn’t get the people going, except for those two songs. Now, in an interesting plot twist, there was a section of fans near Torchy’s Tacos who absolutely loved DMX’s “Roughriders Anthem,” which George Springer had as his walk-up song. They loved it so much they went a cappella and sang it throughout Game 4.

If fans in Houston want to rap the lyrics from the region (New York) they just beat in the American League Championship Series, then go for it. I’m not going to lie and say I wasn’t disappointed that “Grillz,” featuring Paul Wall, couldn’t get some love, since Astros fan Wall offered to give the Astros customized grills (jewelry worn over teeth).

In baseball, much of the city’s musical culture is not about who shows up to represent but rather depends on the selections of its players, the composition of the fan base and the brilliance of the DJ in charge of the playlist. Cody Bellinger and Andrew Toles’ walk-up songs, for instance, are Lamar’s “Humble” and “DNA,” respectively.

The only time I heard music originating from Latin America from either DJ was when Latino players came up to bat. That’s pretty disappointing when you consider that Houston’s Latino population accounted for 35.3 percent of the city’s population in the 2010 census, just 4 percentage points less than white people (39.7), and Los Angeles County and California “have the largest Latino populations of any state or county in the nation,” according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released in 2015.

Just before the start of Game 2, Dodger Stadium played a public service announcement about being courteous to other fans, and the video included almost all Latino children. That was nice to see because in 2014, Latino people took over as California’s largest racial/ethnic group with 14.99 million people in the state. But it reinforced my questions about why I only heard music from the Latin genre when Yasiel Puig, Enrique Hernandez and Yasmani Grandal walked up instead of throughout the game.

No fewer than seven of the 13 position players on Houston’s World Series roster are of Latino heritage. You are bound to hear Latin music in the Astros’ clubhouse. Is it asking too much to blend in some of this music during a three-hour game?

Remember when PSY’s “Gangnam Style” took over Dodger Stadium in 2012? The Korean pop song didn’t just bring Korean people to their feet — fans of all types got in on the Dodger Stadium dance cam action. In that case, and when the Dodgers brought PSY to the stadium in 2013, it was an example of how easy it was to play music inclusive of a community or fan base.

One could argue that inside the ballpark the demographics are not nearly as representative of the overall cities themselves, and the music is being played for the crowd attending. Especially when you’re discussing who does and does not have the disposable income to attend a big four championship event and foot the $1,863 average ticket price.

Fans play a role in the music playlist, but the people playing, at least in the NBA and NFL, are the ones who set the tone with the listening selection. It may not seem like a big deal in the grand scheme of watching a game, but I’ve got to tell you, a good music set can keep fans hyped and locked in.

If both venues can take the time to create food inspired by cultural influences, a more time-consuming task, then is it too much to ask for the stadiums to play music that embodies these different communities on their rosters and in their fan bases? If sports are the melting pot they are billed to be, that should easily extend to music representative of the cities in which the teams play.

Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs — with the famous side part — is back from injury, and shares his barber The Maryland native talks Erykah Badu, stylish cleats and why it’s always gotta be orange juice with the pulp

Like the frigid wind that travels through Minnesota’s winters, Stefon Diggs dashes off the line of scrimmage, often right into the end zone. Through the first four weeks of the NFL season, Diggs, 23, had the most receiving yards (391) in the league and was second in touchdowns (four). Before his Week 5 groin strain, Diggs’ stats were piling up, and the Gaithersburg, Maryland-bred wide receiver was aggressively putting together the type of season that has analysts mentioning his name among the NFL’s elite. And now he’s back. And, along with Giants receiver Sterling Shepard, the debonair Diggs is an NFL style ambassador: They’re the faces of the league’s lifestyle paraphernalia brand. “It’s just to inspire people to rep their team when they’re wearing casual clothes, and feel comfortable in their skin,” said Diggs. “Some guys may just wear their stuff when they’re going to the stadium, but when you’re casually going out, we want you to have that same confidence when putting on your Vikings shirt or Vikings jacket.” The wide receiver took a few minutes to talk Hill Harper, his favorite cereal, his cleats — and his crushes.

What do you do before a big game?

If it’s a home game … probably watch film one more time, pick my outfit out, what I want to wear to the stadium. I’ll eat a bowl of cereal. I love cereal. I always eat a bowl of cereal before I go.

What’s your favorite?

I like Cap’n Crunch, but specifically I like Cap’n Crunch’s Oops! All Berries. Then I’ll listen to Erykah Badu on my way to the stadium.

Any specific album, or song?

“On & On.” That’s like my childhood crush — well, my grown-up crush, because I still love Badu.

When did you realize you were famous?

I still don’t feel that way. I feel pretty regular. I talk to any and everybody, I don’t care who it is. I’m pretty easygoing.

People will accept you for who you are, and if they don’t, don’t pay them attention at all.

What’s the last book you read?

I’m currently reading it again. It’s a Hill Harper book, Letters to a Young Brother. I like that book a lot. I just bought The Autobiography of Gucci Mane. I don’t know when I’m gonna start it.

Where does your courage come from?

My mom, mostly. She had a house full of boys and she raised us the best way she could, considering that my dad had passed. She wasn’t scared of nothing. She’ll step up to any one of us at any given time. My mom isn’t nothing but 5-5, maybe less than that, and you got boys walking around the house 6 feet plus. She’ll punch you at any given time [Laughs].

Where do you get your hair cut?

Details Barber Lounge in St. Paul; his name is Anthony. I’ve been going to him since I got to Minnesota, and you know how people are with their barbers. It took me a little while, but once I found one that I liked, I stuck with him. We pretty cool now.

Favorite throwback television show?

I used to watch The Jamie Foxx Show.

Last show you binge-watched?

Ozark.

How do you find out about new music?

One of my closest friends, Brian, from back home. He puts me on to all the new artists. It’s hard for me to keep up. I have a list of things I have to worry about other than music.

Do you still listen to go-go?

Not as much as I did in my younger days. It’s kind of weird because my first time going to an 18-and-over go-go, I was 14.

Have you ever been starstruck?

Nah, not really. I don’t really look at it that way. I feel like everybody is people. If I met Halle Berry, I probably wouldn’t even be that nervous. LisaRaye was my first crush. I can’t say the first movie that I saw her in … that’s when she first started being my crush. I’ma say the movie anyways, [The] Players Club. I wasn’t supposed to be watching that movie. My momma gon’ kill me.

The last concert you went to?

It was the Jay-Z and Beyoncé On the Run Tour. That was when I was in college. I haven’t been to a concert since.

What’s the last stamp on your passport?

London. Business, but we had a lot of time to do what we wanted. I went sightseeing. I saw a lot of things. I like London, a lot, everything about it. I would live there.

What is in your refrigerator at this moment?

Jell-O, yogurt, chicken breast, orange juice with the pulp. I always gotta have my orange juice with the pulp. I don’t drink regular milk [laughs]; I drink Lactaid.

Do you have any habits that you wish you could shake?

Sometimes, I just gotta organize things around me so I can think. I wish I wouldn’t care, but it’s hard not to when it’s in front of your face.

What would you tell your 15-year-old self?

Stay focused. I would really tell myself to stay focused. That was my first time going to private school. I did not like it — I’ll tell you that right now. I did not like it at all, but at the end of the day it made me the man I am today. It got me here.

A lot of people are talking about your cleats this season. What made you decide to team up with Mache.

We did a little bit of stuff last year, but this year I decided I wanted to do more. I was shooting him ideas before the season really started. When that first game came around, we had some things in play. It kind of took off on its own. All credit to him. We built a friendship. Before, I was just trying to find a cleat guy.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

My dad told me to always be my own man. Don’t be a follower, don’t be a flunky, be your own man, be you. People will accept you for who you are, and if they don’t, don’t pay them attention at all.

Ava DuVernay, John Legend and Marley Dias among Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards honorees ‘Smithsonian’ magazine announces sixth annual awards ceremony and a new festival

Director Ava DuVernay continues to make strides in content creation, and her creativity keeps manifesting into star power. DuVernay — along with other phenomenal creators, including singer John Legend and 12-year-old author Marley Dias — is part of a group of distinguished guests being honored at Smithsonian magazine’s sixth annual American Ingenuity Awards on Nov. 29.

Award recipients were announced last week and span eight categories: technology, performing arts, visual arts, life sciences, physical sciences, history, social progress and youth.

DuVernay, director of the movie Selma and the television show Queen Sugar, is being honored for visual arts. Singer, songwriter and activist Legend is being honored for performing arts. Dias, creator of #1000BlackGirlBooks, is being honored for youth. Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street, received the award for social progress for introducing the character Julia — the first Muppet with autism.

Presenters at the awards ceremony will include iconic composer and music producer Quincy Jones and famed saxophonist Branford Marsalis. The winners will be commemorated in the December edition of Smithsonian magazine.

“This year’s American Ingenuity Awards honorees are revolutionizing American culture,” said Smithsonian editor-in-chief Michael Caruso. “Since their launch, the awards have always recognized the cutting edge of American achievement. It’s no accident that the winners of our physical sciences award last year, the LIGO team, just won the Nobel Prize in physics.”

As part of the awards announcement, Smithsonian magazine also announced the launch of its Smithsonian Ingenuity Festival. Starting on Nov. 15 and continuing through early December, the series of events featuring this year’s American Ingenuity recipients will include discussions with DuVernay and actor David Oyelowo about the new black Hollywood; Legend on what he considers his best album, Darkness and Light, and his recent accomplishments; and a discussion with Jones about his career in music. The festival will also house a re-creation of Duke Ellington’s second Sacred Concert in commemoration of its 50th anniversary by the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra.

“The success of the awards program has led to a major expansion this year, the creation of the Smithsonian Ingenuity Festival,” Caruso said. “The festival will bring to life the spirit of innovation at many of our great Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., and in New York.”

Smithsonian museums hosting events include the Arts and Industries Building; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York; National Museum of American History; National Air and Space Museum; National Museum of Natural History; and National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Most of the events are free, and some require a reservation.

Texans players enraged over Bob McNair’s ‘inmates’ comment and these are the facts Players react and social media delivers as the story unfolds

It’s Week 8 of the NFL season and more drama is unfolding following President Donald Trump’s statements during a speech at a political rally Sept. 22 in Huntsville, Alabama, against kneeling during the national anthem to raise awareness of racial inequalities that started the storm.

While some players are still standing in solidarity and exercising their right to freedom of expression, other players are looking for solutions. But after Houston Texans owner Bob McNair’s statements in a private meeting about the protests were revealed, players are faced with a new issue.

On Oct. 18 during a meeting attended by NFL owners, player union representatives and team executives, McNair said, “We can’t have the inmates running the prison.”

The comment was reported by ESPN’s Seth Wickersham and Don Van Natta Jr. and in ESPN The Magazine, where they cited complex details about the meeting.

As Friday went on, and the story unfolded, here are some facts to consider and players’ reactions.


Others in the meeting were offended by McNair’s characterization.

NFL executive Troy Vincent said he’s been called many things including the N-word but he never felt like an “inmate.” McNair later pulled Vincent aside and apologized, saying that he felt horrible, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

McNair issued a public apology Friday following the ESPN The Magazine report.

“I regret that I used that expression,” McNair said in a statement. “I never meant to offend anyone and I was not referring to our players. I used a figure of speech that was never intended to be taken literally. I would never characterize our players or our league that way and I apologize to anyone who was offended by it.”

McNair’s comments enrage players despite the delivery of the news.

Texans head coach Bill O’Brien held a morning meeting Friday so the players would not be blindsided, sources told Schefter.

Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins was not having any of it.

About 10 players, including Hopkins, left the facility Friday. Sources told Schefter that Hopkins’ absence from practice Friday was directly related to McNair’s comment. Most of the players who left returned to the facility, the source added, and the remaining players were talked out of staging a walkout by the coaching staff. The team is expecting that all players including Hopkins, will make the flight to Seattle Saturday for Sunday’s matchup against the Seahawks. O’Brien called Hopkins’ absence from practice a “personal day.”

An emotional meeting was held for players.

O’Brien, general manager Rick Smith and assistant head coach Romeo Crennel led a 90-minute meeting to allow players to honestly express their feelings. The goal was to make sure that the organization did not splinter and that it would turn protest into progress. The players were emotional during the meeting. The meeting delayed the start of practice.

“When it happened, there’s a thousand emotions going through your mind,” Texans left tackle Duane Brown said. “Obviously, one of the emotions is to leave the building immediately. We decided to go to work. The situation’s not over. It’s something that we’ll reconvene and talk about again, but we had practice today.”

O’Brien said he’s for his players.

“I’m 100 percent with these players,” O’Brien said. “I love these players, I love this coaching staff. We will show up in Seattle and play. We will play very hard. Seattle is a great football team with a great coaching staff. But we will be there when the ball is kicked off in Seattle.”

Brown said he “can’t stay quiet about it.”

The Texans players have not decided what they’ll do for the national anthem but Brown is speaking out. “I think it was ignorant,” Brown said. “I think it was embarrassing. I think it angered a lot of players, including myself. We put our bodies and minds on the line every time we step on that field, and to use an analogy of inmates in prison, that’s disrespectful. That’s how I feel about it.”

When asked if Brown would consider not playing on Sunday because of McNair’s comments, he said he wasn’t sure.

“This game, this locker room, this field that we play on isn’t just about him,” Brown said. “So it’s a lot of factors you have to consider when you step on that field. Definitely something that myself, and I think a lot of people in there, have to consider going forward.

Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins said the players were looking forward to change.

“From a player’s perspective, I think we’ve done a great job of trying to work in a collaborative manner with the league to really come up with solutions, to move forward and create some real change, and I don’t see that changing,” he said. “Obviously, his comments will represent him, but from a player’s standpoint, we’re focused on our goals, we feel like we still have an opportunity to move forward with whoever is interested in doing that, and so hopefully we can get that same type of commitment from those in league leadership.

“That’s our goal. It’s not to appease one another, it’s not to change someone’s personal opinion, it’s just to get some actual work done and change done. That’s what our focus is going to be. Obviously you have quite a few different comments come from different owners, but I feel like players have been very, very diligent in making sure that our message has been one that we want to continue to push forward, that we want to continue to collaborate and move forward. So hopefully we can get to that point.”

Other players and notables took to social media regarding the incident.


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